Donnerstag, 19. Januar 2012

Janis Joplin - Newport Folk Festival, Newport, RI - July 27, 1968

The greatest white female rock singer of the 1960s, Janis Joplin was also a great blues singer, making her material her own with her wailing, raspy, supercharged emotional delivery. First rising to stardom as the frontwoman for San Francisco psychedelic band Big Brother & the Holding Company, she left the group in the late '60s for a brief and uneven (though commercially successful) career as a solo artist. Although she wasn't always supplied with the best material or most sympathetic musicians, her best recordings, with both Big Brother and on her own, are some of the most exciting performances of her era.
She also did much to redefine the role of women in rock with her assertive, sexually forthright persona and raunchy, electrifying on-stage presence.

Here´s a rare bootleg with her performance at the Newport Folk Festival in Rhode Island, 1968.

Tracks:
01 Piece Of My Heart (Jerry Ragovoy, Bert Berns)
02 Summertime (DuBose Heyward, George Gershwin)
03 Coo Coo (Peter Albin)
04 Combination Of The Two (Sam Andrew)
05 Ball and Chain (Willie Mae Thornton)
06 Down On Me (Eddy Head, arr. Janis Joplin)
07 Piece Of My Heart (Reprise) (Jerry Ragovoy, Bert Berns)

BIG BROTHER AND THE HOLDING COMPANY:
Sam Andrew - guitar
Peter Albin - bass
Jim Gurley - guitar
Dave Getz - drums

Janis Joplin - Newport Folk Festival, 1968
(320 kbps, front cover included)

Mittwoch, 18. Januar 2012

Fela Kuti - Upside Down (1976)

"Upside Down", released in 1976, is one of the more unusual items in Fela Kuti's discography from the period.

Not structurally - it's the usual two-song, half-hour deal, the songs beginning with several minutes of instrumental solo trades before the socially conscious lyrics enter. The song "Upside Down" itself, however, is sung not by Kuti but by Sandra Akanke Isidore. She was a woman that he

met during his stay in the United States at the end of the 1960s, and who is credited with helping to elevate his own social awareness and ethnic identity. It's basically like hearing a track by this artist with a different vocalist, then. Although Isidore's pipes aren't as strong as Kuti's, it makes for something refreshingly different in the midst of all those similar two-song releases from the mid-'70s.

The other track, "Go Slow," is a little jazzier, and puts less emphasis on lyrics than most Kuti tracks, with the singing largely limited to chants that punctuate the instrumental arrangement.

Link dead.

Samstag, 14. Januar 2012

"Fragt uns, wir sind die letzten" - "Ask us, we are the last" - Interviews with victims of the fascist regime

This weekend the annual Rosa Luxemburg and Karl Liebknecht demonstration, initiated in the German Democratic Republic and continued in today’s conditions takes place on Sunday 15 January 2012, 10 am at Berlin Friedrichshain.

The demonstration commemorates the murder of the two leaders of the German workers movement by reactionary Freikorps on the orders of the Social Democrat minister Friedrich Ebert.


This gives cause for sharing "Ask us, we are the last, Vol. 1 & 2" - two booklets with memories of victims of the fascist regime and people form the anti-fascist resistance.
These memories are an important counterweight to prevailing images of history and also to those "Zeitzeugen" who apparently knew of nothing - especially not by their own fault.

These interviews are based not so much of a scientific, supposedly objective approach to history, but rather a personal one. How did people experience persecution and / or resistance? What lessons they drew from it? What were (and are) their motivation to engage against fascist ideology?

In a few years there will be no more possibilities of meeting people from persecution and resistance, The more urgent it is to get into conversation with those people to preserve their knowledge and make it available to the public. These booklets can´t replace historical scientific work or even a theoretical discussion. But they can make visible these marginalized perspectives that these perspectives.

"Fragt uns, wir sind die letzten - Ask us, we are the last"
(2 pdf booklets, german language)

Palais Schaumburg - Telephon / Kinder, der Tod (7", 1980)

Palais Schaumburg was a new wave band from Hamburg, Germany. The style was classified as Neue Deutsche Welle, and strongly characterized by their avant garde music and dadaistic attitude.

The band was originally formed in 1980, featuring Timo Blunck, Holger Hiller, Thomas Fehlmann, and percussionist F.M. Einheit. The group's name stands for Das Palais Schaumburg in Bonn, the former residence of German chancellor.

Einheit left the group, eventually to join Einstürzende Neubauten and was replaced by Ralf Hertwig prior to Palais Schaumburg's first full length album "Palais Schaumburg" which was produced by David Cunningham and released in 1981. Shortly after it was released, Hiller left the band and started his solo career. He was replaced with Moritz von Oswald and vocalist Walther Thielsch.

The group made several singles and albums throughout early 80's, where their avant garde sounds were heavily influenced by funk, especially in albums "Lupa" and "Parlez-Vous Schaumburg".

They eventually split up in 1984. All the members have been working on their solo careers.

Here´s a Palais Schaumburg single, released in 1980 on ZickZack.

Tracklist:
A Telephon
B Kinder, der Tod

Palais Schaumburg - Telephon/Kinder der Tod
(192 kbps,  no cover art included)

Dienstag, 3. Januar 2012

Fela Kuti & Africa 70 - Shakara (1972)

Fela Kuti was often described as "the James Brown of Africa," but one could also argue that he was Africa's equivalent of Miles Davis or John Coltrane. Truth be told, either description is valid. Kuti was highly eclectic, and his innovative, visionary music contained elements of funk/soul, jazz, and blues, as well as African music.

That eclectic spirit proves to be a major asset on Shakara, which consists of two 13-minute performances by Kuti's Africa 70 band: "Lady" and "Shakara (Oloie)."

Performed in English, "Lady" finds Kuti criticizing modern African women in a humorous way for becoming what he sees as overly westernized and embracing a western view of feminism. You might agree or disagree with the song's viewpoint, but the groove and the beat are irresistible. Equally addictive - and equally sarcastic - is "Shakara (Oloje)," which is sung in both Yoruba and English and makes fun of the type of pompous, loud-mouthed braggarts who can never make good on their empty boasts.

Fela Kuti & Africa 70 - Shakara (1972)
(320 kbps, front cover included)