Sonntag, 25. August 2013

Bo Diddley - Bo Diddley (1986, Chess)

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"I was the first son-of-a-gun out there. Me and Chuck Berry. And I'm very sick of the lie. You know, we're over that black-and-white crap, and that was all the reason Elvis got the appreciation that he did. I'm the dude that he copied, and I'm not even mentioned."
- Bo Diddley, 2005


"Bo Diddley" is the debut album by rock and roll pioneer and blues icon Bo Diddley. It is a compilation of his singles since 1955 and collects several of his most influential and enduring songs. An innovative guitarist, prolific songwriter, and sensational vocalist (check out "Dearest Darling"), Diddley had an influence on rock music from Buddy Holly to U2 that was all pervasive.

For anyone who wants to play rock & roll, real rock & roll, this is one of the few records that you really need. Along with Chuck Berry, Elvis, Little Richard, Jerry Lee Lewis, Muddy Waters, B.B. King, and a few select others, Bo Diddley was one of the founders of the form & he did it like no other. Diddley had only one real style, that being the Bo Diddley beat: a syncopated, rhythmic drive, loaded with tremolo. There are many examples of it on this record, and that is about all you need. It's one of those records that, after listening to just a few cuts, will find you tapping the beats on every available surface. Diddley's guitar and vocals have a gruff feeling that recalls bluesmen such as Waters, yet he has his own style. Buttressed by drums, funky piano, and usually maracas, it's absolutely infectious.

Bo Diddley - Bo Diddley (1986)
(256 kbps, cover art included)

Freitag, 23. August 2013

VA – El Canto de un Pueblo (1977)


The music on this album was recorded live in August 1977 in Mexico City, during the festival "Jornadas de Solidaridad con la Cultura Uruguaya en el Exilio" (" Days of Solidarity with the Uruguayan Culture in Exil"). The featured artist are Roberto Darwin, Alfredo Zitarrosa, Daniel Vigletty and Camerata Punta del Este from Uruguay, Silvio Rodriguez, Pablo Milanés and Miriam Ramos from Cuba, Los Folkloristas and Amparo Ochoa from Mexico an Tania Libertad from Peru.
 
In the late 1950s, partly because of a world-wide decrease in demand for agricultural products, Uruguayans suffered from a steep drop in their standard of living, which led to student militancy and labor unrest. An urban guerrilla movement known as the Tupamaros emerged, engaging in activities such as bank robbery and distributing the proceeds to the poor, in addition to attempting political dialogue. As the government banned their political activities and the police became more oppressive, the Tupamaros took up an overtly armed struggle.
President Jorge Pacheco declared a state of emergency in 1968, followed by a further suspension of civil liberties in 1972. In 1973, amid increasing economic and political turmoil, the armed forces closed the Congress and established a civilian-military regime.  Around 180 Uruguayans are known to have been killed during the 12-year military rule of 1973 to 1985. Most were killed in Argentina and other neighbouring countries, with 36 of them having been killed in Uruguay.
A new constitution, drafted by the military, was rejected in a November 1980 referendum.
Following the referendum, the armed forces announced a plan for the return to civilian rule, and national elections were held in 1984.


Tracklist:

01. Adagio en mi país (Alfredo Zitarrosa)
02. Tierra mestiza (Los Folkloristas)
03. Mariposas (Silvio Rodríguez)
04. Soy latinoamericano (Roberto Darwin)
05. Gris tango (Camerata Punta del Este)
06. Tengo (Pablo Milanés)
07. Andes lo que andes (Tania Libertad)
08. Masa (Pablo Milanés, Silvio Rodríguez y Miriam Ramos)
09. Te quiero (Amparo Ochoa)
10. Sólo digo compañeros (Daniel Viglietti)

VA - El Canto de un Pueblo (1977)
(256 kbps, cover art included)