Donnerstag, 31. Dezember 2015

Keith Hudson - The Black Morphologist Of Reggae (1983)

Ominously known as "The Dark Prince of Reggae," Keith Hudson was born into a musical family in Kingston, Jamaica in 1946. His musical education began as Hudson worked as a sort of roadie for Skatalite and Jamaican trombone king Don Drummond.

By age 21, Hudson, who had been trained as a dentist, sunk his earnings into his own record label, Inbidimts, and had a hit with Ken Boothe's recording of "Old Fashioned Way." Not long after this chart success, the suddenly hot Hudson was producing some of the biggest names (and soon-to-be biggest names) in reggae - John Holt, Delroy Wilson, Alton Ellis, and the great toasters U-Roy and Dennis Alcapone, all of whom benefited from what would be Hudson's trademark production style: groove-centered, bass/drum-dominated, lean and mean stripped-down riddims.

By the mid-'70s, Hudson began releasing more solo work, hitting paydirt from the start with his 1974 debut, "Entering the Dragon" and his intense second record, "Flesh of My Skin", an ominous, dark record that earned Hudson his title as reggae's "Dark Prince." In 1976, Hudson relocated to New York City and worked pretty much nonstop, producing as well as recording solo records up until 1982. He succumbed to lung cancer in 1984, at age 38, robbing reggae of one its greatest, most adventurous, and unhearalded producers and performers.                

"The Black Morphologist Of Reggae" is the 1983 reissue of album "From One Extreme To Another" (1979). "Nuh Skin Up Dub" (1979) features dub versions of this album.
Big up to the original uploader!

Tracklist:

A1 Anger
A2 No Skinup
A3 Central Kingston
A4 It's Allright
A5 Desiree
B1 (Dreadful) Words
B2 They Don't Hurt
B3 (Bad Things) You Teach Me
B4 One Extreme To Another
B5 Buzzing Bee                                                                                   

Keith Hudson - The Black Morphologist Of Reggae (1983)
(320 kbps, cover art included)

Hortense Ellis - Hortense´s Last Stand

Hortense Ellis, the younger sister of reggae superstar, Alton Ellis, was born April 18th 1941 in Trench Town, Jamaica. Her father worked on the railways while her mother ran a fruit stall.
Hortense was just 18 years old when she appeared on The Vere Johns Opportunity Hour, which was then Jamaica's foremost outlet for undiscovered young talent. Her version of Frankie Lymon's "I'm Not Saying No At All" went down so well with the audience and the panel that she was invited back the following week.

Hortense went on to enter many other competitions and showcases managing to reach six semi-finals and four finals. In 1964 she was awarded a silver cup as Jamaica's Best Female Vocalist - a feat she was to repeat five years later.

By the late sixties, Hortense had extensive experience both in live performance and in the studio. She had toured Jamaica with Byron Lee And The Dragonaires and had begun recording with some of the island's top producers. Among these were Ken Lack, Arthur "Duke" Reid and Clement "Coxsone" Dodd.
Alton Ellis was also recording with Dodd at this time and the family connection was cleverly exploited as Dodd produced "female" adaptions of several of Alton's hits for Hortense to record. The ever-resourceful Dodd also paired Alton and Hortense on a run of classic duets.
The siblings toured Canada in 1970 but by the following year Hortense was back in Jamaica. She married Mikey "Junior" Saunders with whom she had five children in quick succession. Although her live performances suffered as a result, Hortense remained busy in the studio. Recording under the name Mahalia Saunders for producer Lee Perry she cut several sides including "Right On The Tip Of My Tongue" and "Piece Of My Heart".

Hortense's biggest commercial success came in the late seventies with a song cut for Augustus "Gussie" Clarke. "Unexpected Places" was a big hit in Jamaica and was released in Britain on the Hawkeye label.
For producer Bunny Lee, Hortense became Queen Tiney for her "Down Town Ting" - an answer record to the Althea & Donna hit "Uptown Top Ranking" which had itself been based on the rhythm of Alton Ellis's "I'm Still in Love With You".

Around this time, Hortense recut many of her Studio One sides with Soul Syndicate, The, Aggrovators, and the up and coming team of Sly & Robbie.
The rise of the Lovers Rock genre in the late seventies and early eighties resulted in Hortense cutting cover versions of several soul classics including "Down The Aisle" (Patti LaBelle) and "Young Hearts Run Free" (Candi Staton).

Following her divorce from Mikey Saunders, Hortense spent much of the eighties in Miami and New York. On returning to Jamaica in 1989, she began suffering severe health problems; but managed to carry on with occasional live local performances - something she loved immensely.
She recovered sufficiently to make a private visit to New York in the summer of 1999 and then to Miami the following year where illness finally caught up with her.
Hortense Ellis, known by so many in Jamaica and all over the world as "Jamaica's First Lady Of Song", passed away in her sleep in a Kingston hospital on October 18th 2000.

Hortense Ellis - Hortense´s Last Stand
(256 kbps, front cover included)           

Delroy Wilson - Better Must Come... One Day (Jamaican Gold)

PhotobucketLike Dennis Brown and Freddie McGregor, Delroy Wilson was barely out of short trousers when he recorded his debut single for Coxsone Dodd 's Studio One label. His first hit, 'Joe Liges' (1963), was written by Perry, Lee, who at the time was working as a talent-spotter, songwriter and singer for Dodd; the track was a lyrical attack on former Dodd employee and now rival, Prince Buster ('One hand wash the other, but you don't remember your brother, Joe Liges, Joe Liges, stop criticise'), set to a rollicking early ska rhythm. The record was so popular that his follow-up, 'Spirit In The Sky', another Perry-penned barb aimed at Buster, was actually credited to Joe Liges when it was released in the UK on the Bluebeat and Black Swan labels. Delroy went on to cut numerous records in the same vein for Dodd, including 'One Two Three', 'I Shall Not Remove', a duet with Smith, Slim entitled 'Look Who Is Back Again', and the anti-Buster 'Prince Pharaoh', notable for being the only occasion on which Dodd himself is heard on record, admonishing Buster in a coded, spoken outburst.

Wilson's voice broke just in time for the emergence of rocksteady in 1966, and his version of the Tams' 'Dancing Mood' of that year, one of the first rocksteady records, became a monstrous hit, alerting music fans to a new soul-styled crooner to match Ellis, Alton. Throughout the rest of the decade, Wilson, still recording mainly for Studio One, increased his popularity with titles such as 'Riding For A Fall', another Tams cover version, 'Once Upon A Time', 'Run Run', 'Won't You Come Home', 'Never Conquer', 'True Believer', 'One One', 'I'm Not A King', 'Rain From The Skies' and 'Feel Good All Over', as well as covering the Temptations' 'Get Ready'. Leaving Studio One in 1969, Wilson sojourned briefly at Lee, Bunny 's camp, which resulted in a popular reading of the Isley Brothers' 'This Old Heart Of Mine' (1969), before moving to Sonia Pottinger 's Tip Top Records, where he cut the excellent 'It Hurts' and a version of the Elgins' 'Put Yourself In My Place' (both 1969).

He teamed up once more with Bunny Lee and enjoyed a huge Jamaican hit with 'Better Must Come' (1971), which was so popular that it was adopted as a theme song by Michael Manley's PNP to increase their vote among 'sufferers', during that year's election campaign.

In 1972 his success continued with 'Cool Operator', again for Lee, and throughout the next few years he maintained his position as one of reggae's best-loved singers, with songs such as 'Mash Up Illiteracy' and 'Pretty Girl' for Gibbs, Joe, 'Love' for Gussie Clarke, 'Rascal Man' for Winston 'Niney' Holness, a cover version of the Four Tops' 'Ask The Lonely' for J., Harry, 'It's A Shame' (a version of the Detroit Spinners song for Joseph 'Joe Joe' Hookim ), 'Have Some Mercy' for A. Folder, and 'Keep On Running' for Prince Tony. In 1976 his career took a further step forward when he recorded a hugely popular version of Marley, Bob 's 'I'm Still Waiting' for Charmers, Lloyd LTD label, later followed by the well-received Sarge, still regarded by most aficionados as his best set. The misnomered Greatest Hits was also issued by Prince Tony during this period.

Further recordings towards the end of the decade, including 'All In This Thing Together', 'Halfway Up The Stairs' and 'Come In Heaven' for Gussie Clarke, did well, but Wilson's career floundered somewhat during the early part of the 80s, apart from a few sporadic sides, including the popular 'Let's Get Married' for London's Fashion Records.

The Digital age, however, provided a revival of fortunes with the massive 'Don't Put The Blame On Me'/'Stop Acting Strange' for King Jammy in 1987, and 'Ease Up', a cut of the famous 'Rumours' rhythm for Bunny Lee, as well as albums such as Looking For Love for Phil Pratt and Which Way Is Up, produced by Errol 'Flabba' Holt for Blue Mountain, since which time he has once again drifted into semi-retirement. Despite being one of the best singers Jamaica has ever produced, Wilson was rarely able to consolidate the success that came his way; nevertheless, he remained a much-loved and respected, but sorely under used and, outside of reggae circles, underrated performer.

- (Encyclopedia of Popular Music) -


Here´s "Better Must Come... One Day" - a great compilation of music by the great Delroy Wilson on Jamaican Gold, an independent record label from Netherlands specialized in Jamaican music reissues:


Delroy Wilson - Better Must Come... One Day
(192 kbsp)

Alton Ellis - Showcase

PhotobucketAlton Ellis was one of Jamaica's all-time favorite vocalists. Like so many other talented singers, he got his start and gained valuable experience under the tutelage of producer and Studio One label founder, Clement S. Dodd. Alton's singing career began in 1959, and he has maintained headliner status throughout his career. His best-known recordings are those he cut during the "rock steady" period of Jamaican popular music.

Ellis started his career in 1959 as part of the duo Alton & Eddie with Eddie Perkins. Ellis and Perkins recorded for Coxsone Dodd at Studio One before Perkins moved to the United States. Duke Reid took Ellis to his Treasure Isle label in 1962. By the mid 1960s, ska was moving on and the beat was slowing down and becoming associated with the rude boy subculture in Jamaican dancehalls. Recording with a backing trio, The Flames (consisting of his brother Leslie Ellis, David "Baby G" Gordon and a musician called Ronnie), Ellis scored big with the hits "Girl I've Got a Date", "Cry Tough" and "Rock Steady", which lent its name to the newer genre. As rocksteady dominated the Jamaican airwaves for the next two years, Ellis continued to score hits for Treasure Isle, working with artists such as Lloyd Charmers, Phyllis Dillon and The Heptones.

Ellis has lived in England since the 1970s. In England, Ellis established his own Alltone label, which he devoted to both new recordings and compilations of his early classics. The international popularity of Bob Marley and the rise of roots reggae meant that Ellis' considerable legacy was soon overshadowed, but over time, he remained a fondly remembered pioneer of Jamaican music. He made triumphant returns to Jamaica with well-received sets at the Reggae Sunsplash Festival in both 1983 and 1985, and recorded a new single, "Man From Studio One," for Dodd in 1991. Numerous compilations of his work appeared during the CD era, illustrating his stunning consistency. He died on Oct 10, 2008 in London, England.

Alton Ellis - Showcase (192 kbps)

Samstag, 12. Dezember 2015

Rüdiger Klose R.I.P. - 39 Clocks - Pain It Dark (1981)


Originally posted on September, 26th, 2010:

Rüdiger Klose, drummer in a lot of interesting music projecst like 39 Clocks, Cocoon, Kastrierte Philosophen, Mythen in Tüten, Dakota, rk2, Treson, Die Unheilige Allianz died September, 26th at the age of 58. Rest in peace!

The 39 Clocks were "the best German band of the eighties" (German pop scholar Diedrich Diederichsen). The Hanoverian band cultivated a heavy accent and invented the Original Psycho Beat: futuristic, hypnotic 60s psychedelia with a beatbox deferred to the early 80s.

Originally released in 1981, "Pain It Dark" was the debut album from the band and owed no small debt to the Velvet Underground, Suicide, and Nuggets-era garage rock. The band’s spare arrangements, cold German-inflected English vocals, and comfort with discomfort still sounds great today. 
It’s such a joy to discover something from the past that sounds so vital, so ripe for broader discovery and adoration. If the sometimes-harsh sonics and low vocal levels don’t offend, they’re not doing their job. For a band known in their time as tricksters and provocateurs, it’s simply their mode of operation. That’s not to say that songs like “Psycho Beat” and “Radical Student Mob in Satin Boots” aren’t “accessible”—it simply depends on your definition of the word. 

Although VU is clearly the band’s touchstone, the band simply uses them as a jumping-off point. "Pain It Dark" sounds like American garage and proto-punk filtered through some shadow-filled masterpiece of German expressionism.

39 Clocks - Pain It Dark (1981)
(256 kbps, cover art included)