Donnerstag, 31. Dezember 2015

Keith Hudson - The Black Morphologist Of Reggae (1983)

Ominously known as "The Dark Prince of Reggae," Keith Hudson was born into a musical family in Kingston, Jamaica in 1946. His musical education began as Hudson worked as a sort of roadie for Skatalite and Jamaican trombone king Don Drummond.

By age 21, Hudson, who had been trained as a dentist, sunk his earnings into his own record label, Inbidimts, and had a hit with Ken Boothe's recording of "Old Fashioned Way." Not long after this chart success, the suddenly hot Hudson was producing some of the biggest names (and soon-to-be biggest names) in reggae - John Holt, Delroy Wilson, Alton Ellis, and the great toasters U-Roy and Dennis Alcapone, all of whom benefited from what would be Hudson's trademark production style: groove-centered, bass/drum-dominated, lean and mean stripped-down riddims.

By the mid-'70s, Hudson began releasing more solo work, hitting paydirt from the start with his 1974 debut, "Entering the Dragon" and his intense second record, "Flesh of My Skin", an ominous, dark record that earned Hudson his title as reggae's "Dark Prince." In 1976, Hudson relocated to New York City and worked pretty much nonstop, producing as well as recording solo records up until 1982. He succumbed to lung cancer in 1984, at age 38, robbing reggae of one its greatest, most adventurous, and unhearalded producers and performers.                

"The Black Morphologist Of Reggae" is the 1983 reissue of album "From One Extreme To Another" (1979). "Nuh Skin Up Dub" (1979) features dub versions of this album.
Big up to the original uploader!

Tracklist:

A1 Anger
A2 No Skinup
A3 Central Kingston
A4 It's Allright
A5 Desiree
B1 (Dreadful) Words
B2 They Don't Hurt
B3 (Bad Things) You Teach Me
B4 One Extreme To Another
B5 Buzzing Bee                                                                                   

Keith Hudson - The Black Morphologist Of Reggae (1983)
(320 kbps, cover art included)

Hortense Ellis - Hortense´s Last Stand

Hortense Ellis, the younger sister of reggae superstar, Alton Ellis, was born April 18th 1941 in Trench Town, Jamaica. Her father worked on the railways while her mother ran a fruit stall.
Hortense was just 18 years old when she appeared on The Vere Johns Opportunity Hour, which was then Jamaica's foremost outlet for undiscovered young talent. Her version of Frankie Lymon's "I'm Not Saying No At All" went down so well with the audience and the panel that she was invited back the following week.

Hortense went on to enter many other competitions and showcases managing to reach six semi-finals and four finals. In 1964 she was awarded a silver cup as Jamaica's Best Female Vocalist - a feat she was to repeat five years later.

By the late sixties, Hortense had extensive experience both in live performance and in the studio. She had toured Jamaica with Byron Lee And The Dragonaires and had begun recording with some of the island's top producers. Among these were Ken Lack, Arthur "Duke" Reid and Clement "Coxsone" Dodd.
Alton Ellis was also recording with Dodd at this time and the family connection was cleverly exploited as Dodd produced "female" adaptions of several of Alton's hits for Hortense to record. The ever-resourceful Dodd also paired Alton and Hortense on a run of classic duets.
The siblings toured Canada in 1970 but by the following year Hortense was back in Jamaica. She married Mikey "Junior" Saunders with whom she had five children in quick succession. Although her live performances suffered as a result, Hortense remained busy in the studio. Recording under the name Mahalia Saunders for producer Lee Perry she cut several sides including "Right On The Tip Of My Tongue" and "Piece Of My Heart".

Hortense's biggest commercial success came in the late seventies with a song cut for Augustus "Gussie" Clarke. "Unexpected Places" was a big hit in Jamaica and was released in Britain on the Hawkeye label.
For producer Bunny Lee, Hortense became Queen Tiney for her "Down Town Ting" - an answer record to the Althea & Donna hit "Uptown Top Ranking" which had itself been based on the rhythm of Alton Ellis's "I'm Still in Love With You".

Around this time, Hortense recut many of her Studio One sides with Soul Syndicate, The, Aggrovators, and the up and coming team of Sly & Robbie.
The rise of the Lovers Rock genre in the late seventies and early eighties resulted in Hortense cutting cover versions of several soul classics including "Down The Aisle" (Patti LaBelle) and "Young Hearts Run Free" (Candi Staton).

Following her divorce from Mikey Saunders, Hortense spent much of the eighties in Miami and New York. On returning to Jamaica in 1989, she began suffering severe health problems; but managed to carry on with occasional live local performances - something she loved immensely.
She recovered sufficiently to make a private visit to New York in the summer of 1999 and then to Miami the following year where illness finally caught up with her.
Hortense Ellis, known by so many in Jamaica and all over the world as "Jamaica's First Lady Of Song", passed away in her sleep in a Kingston hospital on October 18th 2000.

Hortense Ellis - Hortense´s Last Stand
(256 kbps, front cover included)           

Delroy Wilson - Better Must Come... One Day (Jamaican Gold)

PhotobucketLike Dennis Brown and Freddie McGregor, Delroy Wilson was barely out of short trousers when he recorded his debut single for Coxsone Dodd 's Studio One label. His first hit, 'Joe Liges' (1963), was written by Perry, Lee, who at the time was working as a talent-spotter, songwriter and singer for Dodd; the track was a lyrical attack on former Dodd employee and now rival, Prince Buster ('One hand wash the other, but you don't remember your brother, Joe Liges, Joe Liges, stop criticise'), set to a rollicking early ska rhythm. The record was so popular that his follow-up, 'Spirit In The Sky', another Perry-penned barb aimed at Buster, was actually credited to Joe Liges when it was released in the UK on the Bluebeat and Black Swan labels. Delroy went on to cut numerous records in the same vein for Dodd, including 'One Two Three', 'I Shall Not Remove', a duet with Smith, Slim entitled 'Look Who Is Back Again', and the anti-Buster 'Prince Pharaoh', notable for being the only occasion on which Dodd himself is heard on record, admonishing Buster in a coded, spoken outburst.

Wilson's voice broke just in time for the emergence of rocksteady in 1966, and his version of the Tams' 'Dancing Mood' of that year, one of the first rocksteady records, became a monstrous hit, alerting music fans to a new soul-styled crooner to match Ellis, Alton. Throughout the rest of the decade, Wilson, still recording mainly for Studio One, increased his popularity with titles such as 'Riding For A Fall', another Tams cover version, 'Once Upon A Time', 'Run Run', 'Won't You Come Home', 'Never Conquer', 'True Believer', 'One One', 'I'm Not A King', 'Rain From The Skies' and 'Feel Good All Over', as well as covering the Temptations' 'Get Ready'. Leaving Studio One in 1969, Wilson sojourned briefly at Lee, Bunny 's camp, which resulted in a popular reading of the Isley Brothers' 'This Old Heart Of Mine' (1969), before moving to Sonia Pottinger 's Tip Top Records, where he cut the excellent 'It Hurts' and a version of the Elgins' 'Put Yourself In My Place' (both 1969).

He teamed up once more with Bunny Lee and enjoyed a huge Jamaican hit with 'Better Must Come' (1971), which was so popular that it was adopted as a theme song by Michael Manley's PNP to increase their vote among 'sufferers', during that year's election campaign.

In 1972 his success continued with 'Cool Operator', again for Lee, and throughout the next few years he maintained his position as one of reggae's best-loved singers, with songs such as 'Mash Up Illiteracy' and 'Pretty Girl' for Gibbs, Joe, 'Love' for Gussie Clarke, 'Rascal Man' for Winston 'Niney' Holness, a cover version of the Four Tops' 'Ask The Lonely' for J., Harry, 'It's A Shame' (a version of the Detroit Spinners song for Joseph 'Joe Joe' Hookim ), 'Have Some Mercy' for A. Folder, and 'Keep On Running' for Prince Tony. In 1976 his career took a further step forward when he recorded a hugely popular version of Marley, Bob 's 'I'm Still Waiting' for Charmers, Lloyd LTD label, later followed by the well-received Sarge, still regarded by most aficionados as his best set. The misnomered Greatest Hits was also issued by Prince Tony during this period.

Further recordings towards the end of the decade, including 'All In This Thing Together', 'Halfway Up The Stairs' and 'Come In Heaven' for Gussie Clarke, did well, but Wilson's career floundered somewhat during the early part of the 80s, apart from a few sporadic sides, including the popular 'Let's Get Married' for London's Fashion Records.

The Digital age, however, provided a revival of fortunes with the massive 'Don't Put The Blame On Me'/'Stop Acting Strange' for King Jammy in 1987, and 'Ease Up', a cut of the famous 'Rumours' rhythm for Bunny Lee, as well as albums such as Looking For Love for Phil Pratt and Which Way Is Up, produced by Errol 'Flabba' Holt for Blue Mountain, since which time he has once again drifted into semi-retirement. Despite being one of the best singers Jamaica has ever produced, Wilson was rarely able to consolidate the success that came his way; nevertheless, he remained a much-loved and respected, but sorely under used and, outside of reggae circles, underrated performer.

- (Encyclopedia of Popular Music) -


Here´s "Better Must Come... One Day" - a great compilation of music by the great Delroy Wilson on Jamaican Gold, an independent record label from Netherlands specialized in Jamaican music reissues:


Delroy Wilson - Better Must Come... One Day
(192 kbsp)

Alton Ellis - Showcase

PhotobucketAlton Ellis was one of Jamaica's all-time favorite vocalists. Like so many other talented singers, he got his start and gained valuable experience under the tutelage of producer and Studio One label founder, Clement S. Dodd. Alton's singing career began in 1959, and he has maintained headliner status throughout his career. His best-known recordings are those he cut during the "rock steady" period of Jamaican popular music.

Ellis started his career in 1959 as part of the duo Alton & Eddie with Eddie Perkins. Ellis and Perkins recorded for Coxsone Dodd at Studio One before Perkins moved to the United States. Duke Reid took Ellis to his Treasure Isle label in 1962. By the mid 1960s, ska was moving on and the beat was slowing down and becoming associated with the rude boy subculture in Jamaican dancehalls. Recording with a backing trio, The Flames (consisting of his brother Leslie Ellis, David "Baby G" Gordon and a musician called Ronnie), Ellis scored big with the hits "Girl I've Got a Date", "Cry Tough" and "Rock Steady", which lent its name to the newer genre. As rocksteady dominated the Jamaican airwaves for the next two years, Ellis continued to score hits for Treasure Isle, working with artists such as Lloyd Charmers, Phyllis Dillon and The Heptones.

Ellis has lived in England since the 1970s. In England, Ellis established his own Alltone label, which he devoted to both new recordings and compilations of his early classics. The international popularity of Bob Marley and the rise of roots reggae meant that Ellis' considerable legacy was soon overshadowed, but over time, he remained a fondly remembered pioneer of Jamaican music. He made triumphant returns to Jamaica with well-received sets at the Reggae Sunsplash Festival in both 1983 and 1985, and recorded a new single, "Man From Studio One," for Dodd in 1991. Numerous compilations of his work appeared during the CD era, illustrating his stunning consistency. He died on Oct 10, 2008 in London, England.

Alton Ellis - Showcase (192 kbps)

Samstag, 12. Dezember 2015

Rüdiger Klose R.I.P. - 39 Clocks - Pain It Dark (1981)


Originally posted on September, 26th, 2010:

Rüdiger Klose, drummer in a lot of interesting music projecst like 39 Clocks, Cocoon, Kastrierte Philosophen, Mythen in Tüten, Dakota, rk2, Treson, Die Unheilige Allianz died September, 26th at the age of 58. Rest in peace!

The 39 Clocks were "the best German band of the eighties" (German pop scholar Diedrich Diederichsen). The Hanoverian band cultivated a heavy accent and invented the Original Psycho Beat: futuristic, hypnotic 60s psychedelia with a beatbox deferred to the early 80s.

Originally released in 1981, "Pain It Dark" was the debut album from the band and owed no small debt to the Velvet Underground, Suicide, and Nuggets-era garage rock. The band’s spare arrangements, cold German-inflected English vocals, and comfort with discomfort still sounds great today. 
It’s such a joy to discover something from the past that sounds so vital, so ripe for broader discovery and adoration. If the sometimes-harsh sonics and low vocal levels don’t offend, they’re not doing their job. For a band known in their time as tricksters and provocateurs, it’s simply their mode of operation. That’s not to say that songs like “Psycho Beat” and “Radical Student Mob in Satin Boots” aren’t “accessible”—it simply depends on your definition of the word. 

Although VU is clearly the band’s touchstone, the band simply uses them as a jumping-off point. "Pain It Dark" sounds like American garage and proto-punk filtered through some shadow-filled masterpiece of German expressionism.

39 Clocks - Pain It Dark (1981)
(256 kbps, cover art included)

Samstag, 21. November 2015

Dakar Sound - Volume 1

This is the first in a series of collections of tracks from the famous "Dakar Sound" series.

It brings you some interesting representatives of Dakar´s new urban music of the 1970s to 90s as well as a mingling of passionate and very enchanting songs of Senegal´s most talented traditional singers.

"Dakar Sound" is pleased to invite you to an evening of finest entertainment with the Horoya Band, Madiop Seck, Sekou Diabate, Etoile 3000, Number One, Baobab and many more.

Dakar Sound - Volume 1
(192 kbps, ca. 100 MB)

Freitag, 20. November 2015

Blaze - 25 Years Later

This essential album is a journey thru the life of Lakim, a black activist in the streets of New York and we follow him thru his days - getting exposed to his emotions in songs from spiritual high on "YOU`RE SO SPECIAL" - maybe the best song to the angry and bitter "YOU`RE GONNA MISS MY LOVE" after his babymama told him to leave - he get`s ripped off by a 13 year old girl he is searching for their grandma and so on - motown didn`t like the concept of putting this spoken words interludes on the album , so it`s on the CD only ..respect to Blaze, this album still stands the test of time .

The New Jersey trio's '90 debut album for Maze. Blaze's roster featured vocalist Chris Herbert, keyboardist Josh Milan, and drummer Kevin Hedge, who came together in the '80s doing a good blend of gospel-tinged soul and East Coast dance. They got some attention from the single "So Special," and also the cuts "Get Up" and "Lover Man." They never really hit it big, but did have potential...

Tracklist:
1Get Up5:04
2So Special5:32
3Miss My Love5:20
4You Don't Really Love Me4:19
5Anything For Your Lovin'5:22
6We All Must Live Together6:43
7I Wonder5:59
8Gonna Make It Work6:45
9All That I Should8:24
10Missing You3:34
11Lover Man3:49
12Love Is Forever4:40
13Broad & Market, NWK2:13
14The Hope Song6:06

Blaze - 25 Years Later
(192 kbps, cover art included)    

           

Mittwoch, 4. November 2015

Country Joe & The Fish - Together (1968)

"Together", Country Joe & the Fish's third album, was the group's most consistent, most democratic, and their best-selling record. Unlike their first two albums, which were dominated by Country Joe McDonald's voice and compositions, "Together" featured the rest of the band - guitarists Barry Melton and David Cohen, bassist Bruce Barthol, and drummer Chicken Hirsh - almost as prominently as McDonald.

That's usually a formula for disaster, but in this case it gave the album more variety and depth: McDonald tended to favor droning mantras like the album-closing "An Untitled Protest," which worked better when contrasted with the likes of Melton's catchy anti-New York diatribe, "The Streets of Your Town," and the group-written "Rock and Soul Music."

Songs like the latter cast the group as a soul revue, true, and they couldn't quite pull that off, but "Together" had the charming quality of unpredictability; you never knew what was coming next. Unfortunately, what came next in the band's career was a split. Barthol was out by September 1968, Cohen and Hirsh followed in January 1969. Thereafter, McDonald and Melton fronted various Fish aggregations, but it was never the same, even when this lineup regrouped for "Reunion" in 1977.                

Tracklist:
  1. "Rock and Soul Music" (McDonald, Melton, Cohen, Barthol, Hirsh) – 6:51
  2. "Susan" (Hirsh) - 3:28
  3. "Mojo Navigator" (Denson, Melton, McDonald) - 2:23
  4. "Bright Suburban Mr. & Mrs. Clean Machine" (Hirsh, Melton) - 2:19
  5. "Good Guys/Bad Guys Cheer / The Streets of Your Town" (Melton) - 3:43
  6. "The Fish Moan" - 0:27
  7. "The Harlem Song" (McDonald) - 4:19
  8. "Waltzing in the Moonlight" (Hirsh, Melton) - 2:13
  9. "Away Bounce My Bubbles" (Hirsh) - 2:25
  10. "Cetacean" (Barthol) - 3:38
  11. "An Untitled Protest" (McDonald) - 2:45

Country Joe & The Fish - Together (1968)
(192 kbps, cover art included)

Samstag, 10. Oktober 2015

Semer Reloaded

Semer Reloaded - Live Recording für ein musikalisches Denkmal

Maybe this project finds your interest and your support:

"A Golden Age of Jewish music almost forgotten - the songs captured in 30s' Berlin by Hirsch Lewin on his Semer label. “Semer Reloaded” brought this amazing music back to life with critically acclaimed concerts throughout Europe in 2012-15. Now it is our dream to record this music live in concert so that, 70 years after the Holocaust, the legacy of the Semer label can be passed on to present and future generations.    
CD cover

From Artistic Director, Alan Bern:

We're asking for your help to cover the basic costs of the recording of “Semer Reloaded." With your support we can bring Hirsch Lewin's Semer Label and the legacy of Jewish musicians in Berlin in the 1920s-30s back to life, 70 years after the end of the Holocaust, with fresh interpretations, re-workings and arrangements of originals, to be recorded live by a world-class ensemble of artists based in Berlin and New York, such as Grammy winner Lorin Sklamberg, Daniel Kahn, Sasha Lurje and others.

It's an almost incredible story. Berlin in the 1920s was home to a true Golden Age of Jewish music and musicians. Then, in the 1930s, even as the Nazis came to power and brutally repressed Jews and Jewish culture, Hirsch Lewin's Semer label recorded dozens of Jewish artists for posterity, before they were silenced by the Holocaust. On November 9, 1938, SA hordes destroyed Hirsch's Hebraica/Judaica shop in Berlin's Scheunenviertel district, including 4,500 records and about 250 metal plates and the Semer label was shut down. For decades, the recordings were lost and virtually forgotten, until they were heroically recovered and restored by musicologist Rainer E. Lotz. In 2012, the Berlin Jewish Museum commissioned me (Alan) to create a concert of new arrangements of the archival recordings. To realize the project, I put together a great band that unites senior pioneers of Jewish music like Lorin Sklamberg and Paul Brody with the new generation of amazing performers such as Daniel Kahn, Sasha Lurje, Mark Kovnatskiy and others. The result is Semer Reloaded.

With your support, we can present this incredible music not only as an archive of 80-year-old recordings or for a few lucky concert audiences, but as living music for the whole world through a state-of-the-art album release with great sound quality. We've got a strong a supporter in the Gorki theatre in Berlin, which has agreed to host our recording sessions live in concert. We'll team up with London-based music producer Ben Mandelson, and Berlin-based Piranha Records will take on the task of producing a high-quality recording as well as publishing and distributing it. Only 80 seats will be available for the concerts on on the 3rd and 4th November: by contributing only 30 EUR to the campaign you can witness the recording first-hand!"

You will find more information via https://www.startnext.com/en/semer-reloaded.

And here is a report about Semer Reloaded from "3sat" that shows some insights, musical performances and the musicians involved in Semer Reloaded - Alan Bern, Paul Brody, Mark Kovnatskiy, Martin Lillich, Sasha Lurje, Fabian Schnedler and Lorin Sklamberg:
_ www.youtube.com/watch?t=12&v=1Xky4Omql5g.

Mittwoch, 7. Oktober 2015

John Lee Hooker - I´m John Lee Hooker (1959)

Winding through the literally hundreds of titles in John Lee Hooker's catalog is a daunting task for even the most seasoned and learned blues connoisseur. This is especially true when considering Hooker recorded under more than a dozen aliases for as many labels during the late '40s, '50s, and early '60s.

"I'm John Lee Hooker" was first issued in 1959 during his tenure with Vee Jay and is "the Hook" in his element as well as prime. Although many of these titles were initially cut for Los Angeles-based Modern Records in the early '50s, the recordings heard here are said to best reflect Hooker's often-emulated straight-ahead primitive Detroit and Chicago blues styles. The sessions comprising the12-track album are taken from six sessions spread over the course of four years (1955-1959). Hooker works both solo - accompanied only by his own percussive guitar and the solid backbeat of his foot rhythmically pulsating against plywood - as well as in several different small-combo settings. Unlike the diluted, pop-oriented blues that first came to prominence in the wake of the British Invasion of the early to mid-'60s, the music on this album is infinitely more authentic in presentation.

As the track list indicates, "I'm John Lee Hooker" includes many of his best-known and loved works. From right out of the gate comes the guttural ramble-tamble of "Dimples" in its best-known form. Indeed it can be directly traced to - and is likewise acknowledged by - notable purveyors of Brit rock such as Eric Burdon - who incorporated it into the earliest incarnation of the Animals, the Spencer Davis Group, as well as the decidedly more roots-influenced Duane Allman. Another of Hooker's widely covered signature tunes featured on this volume is "Boogie Chillun." This rendering is arguably the most recognizable in the plethora of versions that have seemingly appeared on every Hooker-related compilation available. Additionally, this version was prominently featured in The Blues Brothers movie as well as countless other films and adverts. Likewise, a seminal solo "Crawlin' King Snake" is included here. The tune became not only a staple of Hooker's, it was also prominently included on the Doors' "L.A. Woman" album and covered by notable bluesmen Albert King, B.B. King, and Big Joe Williams, whose version predates this one by several decades.

"I'm John Lee Hooker" is one of the great blues collections of the post-World War II era. Time has, if anything, only reinforced the significance of the album. It belongs in every blues enthusiast's collection without reservation.                

Tracklist:
A1Dimples
A2Hobo Blues
A3I'm So Excited
A4I Love You Honey
A5Boogie Chillun
A6Little Wheel
B1I'm In The Mood
B2Maudie
B3Crawlin' King Snake
B4Every Night
B5Time Is Marching
B6Baby Lee

John Lee Hooker - I´m John Lee Hooker (1959)
(256 kbps, cover art included)

Samstag, 3. Oktober 2015

Chambers Brothers - Love, Peace and Happiness / Live At Bill Graham's Fillmore East (1969)


Love, Peace and Happiness is a double album by The Chambers Brothers, which was released in December 1969.
This album was released as a double-LP, which was composed of some live material recorded at Bill Graham's Fillmore East and some studio recordings.

The brothers seemed to really believe in the title track's message, and they earned style points by including white drummer Brian Keenan, making them one of the few racially mixed American bands. This album, originally released as a double LP, is half studio and half live. The studio sides reflect the message with titles such as "Have a Little Faith" and "To Love Somebody." But the brothers lose their way in covers of songs by the Bee Gees and Marvin Hamlisch, and the epic title track never coheres like "Time Has Come Today." The live sides are better, with stronger material, including "I Can't Turn You Loose" and "People Get Ready." The boys have some fun with the encore, a barbershop medley.      

Tracklist:
A1Have A Little Faith
A2Let's Do It
A3To Love Somebody
A4If You Want Me To
A5Wake Up
B1Love Peace And Happiness (L + P = H In Three Movements)
C1Wade In The Water
C2Everybody Needs Somebody
C3I Can't Turn You Loose
D1People Get Ready
D2Bang Bang
D3You're So Fine
D4Medley - Undecided/Love,Love,Love

Chambers Brothers - Love, Peace and Happiness / Live At Bill Graham's Fillmore East (1969) 
(320 kbps, cover art included)

Dienstag, 4. August 2015

Howlin' Wolf‎ – Cadillac Daddy - Memphis Recordings, 1952

You can't possibly fault the material aboard this 12-song collection of Howlin' Wolf's Memphis recordings cut for Sam Phillips. The title track features some truly frightening guitar work from Willie Johnson,and all the material here is loaded with feral energy and a sense that it could fall apart at any second. It's totally intuitive music, with Wolf seemingly making it all up as he went along, which Sam Phillips had the patience to capture as it all went down. These are some of the great moments in blues history...

These are the recordings that prompted Sun Records chief Sam Phillips's oft-repeated assertion: "This is where the soul of a man dies." Phillips oversaw sessions by the likes of Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, and B.B. King, but the guttural electric blues of Howlin' Wolf captured his fancy like nothing else - and it's not hard to see why. The Wolf of these '52 sessions was just a few years off the farm, having begun to play West Memphis, Arkansas, juke joints, and cat houses following World War II. Working with a small but feral band highlighted by lead guitarist Willie Johnson (called by some the Jimi Hendrix of his day), the already middle-aged singer and harmonica player created a sound in the early '50s that bridged the Mississippi blues that were his roots with the amped Chicago blues that were his destiny. Phillips captured the man born Chester Burnett on the title track, "Drivin' C.V. Wine," and also on the other 10 selections included here, three of which were previously released while all but one of the remaining numbers have never appeared before in North America. Wolf's Chess sides are, of course, landmarks, but this is Wolf untamed and running wild. --Steven Stolder


Tracklist:
                           
A1Cadillac Daddy (Mr. Highway Man)
A2Bluebird Blues
A3My Last Affair (Take 1)
A4Oh Red! (Take 2)
A5Come Back Home
A6Dorothy Mae
B1Decoration Day Blues
B2Color And Kind
B3Drinkin' C.V. Wine
B4I Got A Woman (Sweet Woman)
B5Everybody's In The Mood
B6My Baby Walked Off

Howlin' Wolf‎ – Cadillac Daddy - Memphis Recordings, 1952
(320 kbps, cover art included)

Mittwoch, 29. Juli 2015

Mikis Theodorakis - The Faces Of The Sun - Happy Birthday, Mikis Theodorakis!

"Born on July 29, 1925 on the island of Chios, Mikis Theodorakis has seen nine decades of political developments in Greece - and continually responded to them in music. Often referred to as Greece's most famous living composer, he studied music in Paris under Olivier Messiaen and is known for writing the scores to films like "Zorba the Greek" (1964) and "Serpico" (1973). With his roots in classical music, he also pursued traditional Greek music, for many years in collaboration with talented singer Maria Farantouri.

Politically, Theodorakis was associated with the left-wing and became a vocal member of the resistance when the right-wing junta took power in the late 1960s, which led to a time in jail and exile for the musician. Theodorakis was elected to parliament three times - in 1964, 1981 and 1990 - and served as a minister in the 1990s.

Currently, Mikis Theorakis is suffering from the physical injuries resulting from a tear gas attack while he was participating in an anti-austerity demonstration in Athens in 2012. On the occasion of his 90th birthday, singer Maria Farantouri, who was his musical muse and long-time artistic colleague, tells DW what it was like to work with the composer and activist.

DW: Ms. Farantouri, Mikis Theodorakis discovered you as a singer during a performance in 1963. You were 16 at the time and quickly became the main interpreter of his music. Looking back, how would you describe this period?

Maria Farantouri: During the military dictatorship in Greece [Eds: 1967-1974] and just before it, I starting singing with Mikis Theodorakis and all my songs had to do with social justice, peace, solidarity, and humanity. Of course they also had an artistic message and nice melodies - Theodorakis was a very good musician, composer and conductor.

In the 1960s, music was very closely linked to politics and social struggles - it played a different role back then. We demonstrated against the political situation because we had neither freedom nor democracy.

Today, the finance crisis has made things difficult. We have somewhere around 1.5 million unemployed people. We still cannot believe that. The people are lacking basic needs and don't even have enough food.
I'm not a politician, but we - Europe and Greece - have to find a balance. Greece cannot continue like this.

There was a sense of upheaval in Greece in the 1960s, after World War II, occupation, civil war, and the wave of emigration in the 1950s. The young generation wanted to start anew. Theodorakis embodied this sentiment - politically, because he was part of the resistance and had been arrested, tortured and banned. But also musically through his songs, which were received with enthusiasm. Nevertheless, society had been divided even before the dictatorship and the left-wing was persecuted. At the same time, people held together…

Yes, not only the left, but all democrats held together, no matter which party they belonged to. There was a lot of discussion about democracy and everyone was supposed to fight for it. Those who were suspected of being too left-wing were forbidden from working. Only those on the right got jobs. Democrats and those who leaned to the left had big problems. Sometimes it was enough if you were just seen with a left-wing newspaper.

When Theodorakis discovered me, I was 16. That is what was happening in Greece, and we were young. The police knew what I did with Theodorakis. My family wasn't left, but center - democrats. But my colleagues, my friends, the circle of people around Theodorakis, the poets - they were all on the left, of course. However, they were not communists like in the Soviet Union; we were left-wing Europeans.

For us, humanity and peace were very important - especially peace. There were many wars at that time.

Your amazing voice played an important role, of course…

I was lucky. Mikis had an influence on me. He gave me a feeling for his convictions; he gave me everything. I was a young girl then and was to become a classically trained soprano at the music school. But Theodorakis said, "No, the best school is with me. You have to stay with me."

And so I followed him everywhere. I had some health problems in my younger years and was often in the hospital. But singing gave me access to the world.

In 1967, Mikis Theodorakis was arrested by the military junta and his music was banned because he'd joined the resistance. It was you, who - from exile in France - continued to fight against the dictatorship by carrying Theodorakis' songs into the world. It was through international protest that Theodorakis was able to immigrate to France in 1970 and you performed charity concerts there to support the families of victims of political persecution in Greece. When the regime was toppled in 1974, you had become a symbol of resistance and Theodorakis a national hero.

It's important to keep in mind that Greece is the source of Theodorakis' inspiration. Sometimes that is misunderstood and he is accused of being a nationalist. But he is not a nationalist. He simply believes that history and knowledge give him strength and energy to do great things.

This contradiction can be found in many charismatic personalities. I can only say that I was very lucky to meet this man. Otherwise I would have just become a good classical singer. With Mikis, it's a continuous journey - even now that he's 90 years old. He's alive, he's at home, and we communicate. And I feel at 66 like I was just starting - like a young girl. I would like to learn new things, understand and express myself. That's how I grew up with Miki, and that's why I say he's my father.

In honor of Mikis Theodorakis' 90th birthday, Maria Farantouri is going on tour in Europe, giving concerts in Berlin (25.09.), Amsterdam (27.09.), Luxemburg (28.09), and Brussels (29.09.)."

 - From: www.dw.com

"The "Faces of the sun" are based on the collection of poems: "Colours and vowels". They express my concept of greek song today, as much as it concers melody - vere - rythme - voice." - Mikis Theodorakis

Tracklist:
1The Way Of The Moon
2It's Been A Long Time Since I've Seen You
3The 3 Days
4Stop Here
5The Hide And Seek
6You Speak In A New Way
7At This Moment Of The Day
8Speak To Me In Another Way
9The Way You Talk To Me
10The Way You Look At Me
11It's Getting Dark
12The Faces Of The Sun
13To Come Here
14With A Half Moon
15The Time Of The Fire
16The Sea At Noon
17This Tree


Mikis Theodorakis - The Faces Of The Sun
(256 kbps, cover art included)

Dienstag, 28. Juli 2015

Doc Watson & Son - Same (1965)

Merle Watson's debut with father Doc Watson was recorded shortly after they performed their first concerts together in California, and it shows the duo's musical partnership already in full flower, an incredible fact considering that Merle had only been picking guitar for eight months!
The best songs here turned up on later Vanguard best-ofs, but there's a fair amount of greatness in the astonishing instrumental medley "Fiddler's Dram/Whistling Rufus/Ragtime Annie" and "Little Stream of Whiskey," an old Irish drinking song transformed into a hobo ballad with a bouncy fingerpicked melody.
 
Perhaps most astonishing is the solo harmonica workout "Mama Blues," in which the elder Watson imitates the sound of a child crying, showing off yet another facet of his incredible musical skill.                


Tracklist:

A1Muskrat2:51
A2Weary Blues2:10
A3Medley2:09
A4Dream Of The Miner's Child2:45
A5Rising Sun Blues4:17
A6Mama Blues2:18
A7We Shall All Be Reunited2:10
B1Little Stream Of Whiskey2:25
B2Little Sadie2:57
B3Beaumont Rag1:37
B4Otto Wood The Bandit3:14
B5Faithful Soldier3:09
B6Memphis Blues1:32
B7Gonna Lay Down My Old Guitar2:06

Doc Watson & Son – Doc Watson & Son (1965)      
(320 kbps, cover art included)                             

Sonntag, 31. Mai 2015

VA - Steam Ballads (Broadside, 1977)

"Steam Balldads" was an album released on the Broadside label way back in 1977. This album features mostly 19th century railroad ballads and songs, performed by Harry Boardman, Jon Raven, Tony Rose and Kempion

Tracks:
01 - Harry Boardman - Navvy On The Line
02 - Jon Raven - The Bold Navvies
03 - Jon Raven - Paddy Works On The Railway
04 - Tony Rose - Opening Of The Newcastle & Shields Railway
05 - Harry Boardman - Johnny Greens Trip Fra Owdhum
06 - Kempion - Opening Of The Birmingham & Liverpool Railway
07 - Kempion - The Iron Horse
08 - Jon Raven - The Oxford & Hampton Railway
09 - Kempion - The Cockney's Trip To Brummagem
10 - Tony Rose - The Wonderful Effects Of The Leicester Railway
11 - Jon Raven - Cosher Bailey
12 - Tony Rose - Moses Of The Mail
13 - Tony Rose - The Fireman's Growl

VA - Steam Ballads (1977, Broadside)
(192 kbps, front & back cover included)

Montag, 13. April 2015

Jumpin´ With The Big Swing Bands

This one is made for dancin´. Made for swingin´!
It´s a Savoy Jazz compilation with some of the most famous and swingin´-est bands of that era, containing some rare and jumpin´ recordings.

"Jumping With the Big Swing Bands" collects various swing-era tracks by such popular dance band leaders as Louis Prima, Jimmie Lunceford, and Harry James. Included here are such rare cuts as Lunceford's "Sit Back and Ree-Lax" and "Shut Out."

Tracklist:

1. Call The Police - Jimmie Lunceford & His Orchestra
2. Robin Hood - Louis Prima & His Orchestra
3. Junction - Harry James & His Orchestra
4. Lester Young Tush - Earle Warren & His Orchestra
5. Cement Mixer - Jimmie Lunceford & His Orchestra
6. Hodge Podge - Harry James & His Orchestra
7. Margie - Jimmie Lunceford & His Orchestra
8. Down The Road A Piece - Ray McKinley & His Orchestra
9. Water Faucet - Jimmie Lunceford & His Orchestra
10. Boog It - Harry James & His Orchestra
11. Them Who Has Gets - Jimmie Lunceford & His Orchestra
12. Sand Storm - Ray McKinley & His Orchestra
13. Circus In Rhythm - Earle Warren & His Orchestra/Lester Young
14. Sit Back And Ree-lax - Jimmie Lunceford & His Orchestra
15. Headin' For Hallelujah - Harry James & His Orchestra
16. Hangover Square - Ray McKinley & His Orchestra
17. Shut Out - Jimmie Lunceford & His Orchestra
18. Brooklyn Boogie - Louis Prima & His Orchestra
19. Jimmies, The - Jimmie Lunceford & His Orchestra
 
(256 kbps, front cover included)

Sonntag, 12. April 2015

VA - All That Jive (Savoy Jazz)

Image"All That Jive" (Savoy Jazz) compiles such iconic jive- and scat-oriented recordings as Dizzy Gillespie's "Oop Bop Sh'bam" and Slim Gaillard's "Flat Foot Floogie."

This is legendary stuff off the Savoy label and while it is available elsewhere, this is nonetheless a superb introduction to some classic jazz humor of the late '40s.

From the linernotes:"We hope this album brings back some of what´s often been missing in jazz for the past few decades - that sense of humor and lightheartedness which was there before the egg headed intellectuals discovered the music and started taking it - and themselves - way too seriously. Just have a ball and, while you´re at it, check out what´s being played, too. It´ll get you either way."

VA - All That Jive (Savoy Jazz)
(256 kbps)

Donnerstag, 2. April 2015

Howlin Wolf - Moanin´ In The Moonlight (1958)

Moanin' in the Moonlight was the debut album by American blues singer Howlin' Wolf. The album was a compilation of previously issued singles by Chess Records. It was originally released by Chess Records as a mono-format LP record in 1959. The album has been reissued several times, including a vinyl reissue in 1969 titled Evil.

The two earliest songs on Moanin' in the Moonlight were "Moanin' at Midnight" and "How Many More Years". These two songs were recorded at Sam Phillips' Memphis Recording Service in Memphis, Tennessee on May 14, 1951 or August 1951. These two songs were sold to the Chess brothers, Leonard and Phil, who released them as a single on August 15, 1951. The rest of the songs on the album were recorded in Chicago, Illinois and were produced by either the Chess brothers and/or Willie Dixon.

In 1987 Moanin' in the Moonlight was given a W.C. Handy Award under the category of "Vintage/Reissue Album (US)". Rolling Stone magazine ranked the album as #153 on their list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. Robert Palmer has cited "How Many More Years" (recorded May 1951) as the first record to feature a distorted power chord, played by Willie Johnson on the electric guitar.

An essential listening of the highest order!

Tracklist:
Moanin' At Midnight2:43
How Many More Years2:58
Smokestack Lightnin'2:32
Baby, How Long2:18
No Place To Go2:31
All Night Boogie2:16
Evil3:01
I'm Leavin' You2:29
Moanin' For My Baby2:17
I Asked For Water (She Gave Me Gasoline)2:47
Forty-Four3:02
Somebody In My Home2:59

Howlin Wolf - Moanin´ In The Moonlight (1958)
(320 kbps, cover art included)

Chicago - The Blues - Today! Vol. 3


Notes from the original release of "Chicago/The Blues/Today Vol. 3":

Johnny Shines and Walter Horton sit around a table in Johnny’s apartment drinking a little from a fifth of Teacher’s, and after the television set in the next room is shut off the talk goes back to their early years in the blues. “Robert Johnson?” Shines laughs and shakes his head. “I ran with Robert for two years when I was first starting to sing. He was only a year or so older than I was and I was seventeen at that time. When? It must have been in 1933—in Helena, Arkansas.” Walter interrupts, “You couldn’t run with Robert for long; he wouldn’t stay in one place.” Johnny shrugs, “He did run off after we got here to Chicago. We were staying someplace—I don’t remember where it was—and he got up in the middle of the night and left. Just like that! I didn’t see him for five months.” Walter has another drink. “He was that kind of fellow. If anybody said to him ‘let’s go’ it didn’t matter to him where it was they were going, he’d just take off and go. It didn’t matter, either, what time of day or night it was.” Johnny Young leans against the bar where his band works on 47th Street, his broad, worried face perspiring from the last set. “I grew up in Vicksburg so I heard all them guys. Even Charley Patton. Of course he didn’t come to see me, I was too young. He come to see other people, but I was there anyway. The mandolin? I was playing that back in Vicksburg, but I did hear Charlie McCoy play, too. He was a mandolin player living over in Jackson that made some records about that time.”

The poor, hard city life in the Chicago slums has changed the Mississippi, the Alabama and Tennessee blues styles, but the ties between the old country music and the new city blues are still close. For the men in their twenties and thirties, Junior Wells, Otis Rush, Jimmy Cotton, Buddy Guy, it’s less personal—it’s something that they’ve heard other people talking about—but for the men in their late forties and early fifties, Johnny Shines, Walter Horton, Johnny Young, it’s a direct, still living involvement. You sit at a crowded table trying to listen to Johnny Young over the noise of the people around you and the words of the blues could be from Tennessee in the 1930’s. “I asked sweet mama, let me be your kid...” He could have heard it on a Sleepy John Estes record, but it’s as much like the other things he sings as it is like Estes. Johnny stands on the low bandstand, his tie knotted in place and his coat still buttoned, despite the hot, stale air of the club. “I’m stealin’ back to my same old used to be...”

In the early 1950’s Johnny Shines came into a recording studio and did a piece called “Ramblin’” that came closer to the emotionalism and the musical style of Robert Johnson than anything else he has done before or since. He took a moment to remember, then nodded, “‘Ramblin’’ was really picked out of the sky. We got there to the studio and we didn’t have enough time and we didn’t have arrangements for anything; so I just started singing the first thing that came into my mind...” Without arrangements or much time Johnny went back to the first blues style that he’d known, and today he still sometimes puts the guitar in an old Mississippi open tuning and begins to
sing with some of Robert’s inflection and phrasing, the style as natural to Johnny as it was to Robert. The open tuning and the bottleneck go back even earlier for him. “I had an older brother, Willie Reed, who played, and I tried to learn from him, but I couldn’t make all the chords that he could...” Johnny grew up in Frazier, Tennessee, just north of Memphis. There’s a shopping center there now, but the rest of the town has become a suburb of Memphis. “...Then one day I ran into Howlin’ Wolf, who was young himself a that time, and I saw how he was playing with the open tuning and the slide. I said to myself, ‘If it’s that easy I can do it too.’ Wolf went away and left his guitar there and when he came back I was playing the same thing that he had just played...” A young man at 51, Johnny’s voice is one of the strongest and most exciting sounds in the Chicago blues today, and his music is a complex intermingling of the country and the city—the Delta melodic lines and the Chicago bass guitar and backbeat drumming—the South Side harmonic structure and the Delta verses, “Mister Boweevil, you done ate up all my cotton and corn...”

“Walter? I’ve known him most of my life.” “...The reason Johnny and I know what each other is going to play is that we started together when we were kids in Memphis.” The casual, drifting life of the early bluesmen kept the men close to each other and they drifted in twos or threes from job to job. Shines and Walter Horton started playing together in Memphis and they stayed together through the ragged years of the Depression, working at occasional jobs and running into each other when they were in the same town. Living not far from each other in Chicago and working with each other’s bands—“...When Johnny did ‘Ramblin’’ and ‘Brutal Hearted Woman’ he was working in my band in a club on West Madison...”—kept the country roots of their music strong and vigorous. A tall, nervous man, his face worn and scarred, Walter Horton, “Big Walter,” “Shakey Walter,” now limits his playing to a few sets with the bands working near his apartment on Indiana Avenue. When he’s feeling well he’s one of the most challenging harp men on the South Side. His health is poor and he works irregularly, but when he’s on the playing is magnificent, his thin body moving unsteadily across the bandstand, his face withdrawn and intent in the dim lights.

The blues backgrounds of Mississippi and Tennessee are woven into the fabric of the music that Johnny Shines and Walter Horton play. It’s in the shifting, restless sound of Johnny Young’s mandolin and in the insistent push of Johnny’s guitar accompaniments, in the verses of his blues and his singing style. The blues has changed in Chicago, but it’s still close to the country background, and it’s a music that has gone beyond the limits of its South Side neighborhoods. Memphis Charlie Musselwhite, who plays two harp duets with Walter Horton, is in his early twenties, and he’s white. He’s from the South and he’s grown up with the blues, so he’s been able to cross over into the South Side blues world. He was already playing when he came to Chicago, but Walter’s helped him, and when Charlie’s working with Johnny Young’s band Walter tries to get down on a Saturday night to do a set with him.

This is the blues in Chicago today—the new virtuosity of men like Junior Wells and Otis Rush, the country sound of J. B. Hutto and Homesick James, the exuberance of Jimmy Cotton and Otis Spann, the deep blues involvement of Johnny Shines. Johnny Young, and Walter Horton, the young men learning the style like Memphis Charlie. A new music has emerged out of the poverty and the anger of the South Side, a living music that has kept its own audience, its own expression, and its own truth. To hear it today all you have to do is take the El down to 40th or 47th Street...walk a few blocks through the empty streets...it’s fifty cents for a bottle of beer and as you sit at a table as close as you can get to the band the music fills the club around you like a sweet, intense voice that won’t stop singing...

I’d like to thank Bob Koester and Pete Welding, who have long been involved with the Chicago blues, for their help and their advice during the trips to Chicago that led to these recordings. Bob, on his Delmark label, and Pete, on his Testament label, have recorded a number of South Side bluesmen, and have done important work in bringing the Chicago music of today to a wider audience.

Chicago - The Blues - Today! Vol. 3
(192 kbps, ca. 56 MB)

Donnerstag, 19. März 2015

Howlin Wolf - In Concert (1964)

 
Of the myriad circulating live Wolf albums of dubious fidelity and legality, this is the best of the bunch, both from an audio standpoint and the pronouncement in the booklet that royalties were indeed being paid to Wolf's widow.

This is Wolf's portion of the show as part of the traveling American Folk Blues entourage, the first festival type presentation of the whole blues spectrum to invade Europe. This 1964 tour is the one that brought the real thing to locales where he had previously been only a name on a phonograph record, and the romantic notions projected into the sound that record gave off. With somewhat subdued but nonetheless solid support from right hand man Hubert Sumlin on lead guitar, Sunnyland Slim on piano, Willie Dixon on upright bass, and Clifton James on drums, Wolf runs through a 45-minute set loaded with classics and presented with a positively genial charm. The lack of Wolf's regular rhythm section (although Dixon played bass on many of the records from this period) lends a different flavor to these versions.

Many of the selections seem mistitled here ("Tell Me What I've Done" is "I Didn't Mean To Hurt Your Feelings," "Shake For Me" is "Shake It For Me," "May I Have A Talk With You" is "Love Me," etc.), but as this November 6th performance in Bremen, Germany unfolds, it becomes apparent that the odd titles come from Wolf's introductions. Everything is stretched to a nice, comfortable length here, as Wolf sets both mood and pace, with no tune clocking in at anything less than four minutes and "Goin' Down Slow" and "Forty-Four" reaching the six- and seven-minute mark. Even though the drums and Sumlin's guitar are perhaps muted in the mix more than they should be, the overall sound shows just how well these blues veterans worked together. Just how essential this performance is to a Wolf collection would be in debate, but once you're under the spell, you want to hear it all, and this is a fine addition for someone who's in it for the long haul.     
          
Turn up the volume, and after a little while you won't hardly notice the lack of 21st century fidelity. Any semi-serious blues fan should listen to this wonderful recording of Howlin' Wolf in his prime...

Howlin Wolf - In Concert (1964)
(320 kbps, cover art included)