Mittwoch, 20. Dezember 2017

Atahualpa Yupanqui - L´Integrale, Vol. 5

Atahualpa Yupanqui was a legendary Argentine folk musician and philosopher whose fame was revived during the politically charged "nueva cancion" movement of the 1960s.

He became one of the most valuable treasures for the local culture. As a child living in the small town of Roca, province of Buenos Aires, Héctor Roberto Chavero was seduced by traditional music, especially by the touching sound of the acoustic guitar. After taking violin lessons, the young man began learning how to play guitar, having musician Bautista Almirón as his teacher. For many years, Atahualpa Yupanqui traveled around his native country, singing folk tunes and working as muleteer, delivering telegrams, and even working as a journalist for a Rosario newspaper. In the late '30s, the artist started recording songs, making his debut as a writer in 1941 with Piedra Sola, later writing a famous novel called Cerro Bajo. I

n 1949, the singer/songwriter went on tour around Europe for the first time, including performances with France's Edith Piaf. During the following decades Atahualpa Yupanqui achieved an impressive amount of national and international recognition, becoming an essential artist, a distinguished Latin American troubadour, and influencing many prominent musicians and Argentinean folk groups. 

Atahualpa Yupanqui passed away in France in May, 1992.                 

Here´s the final part of the "L´Integrale" set:


Tracklist:
1.El Payador Perseguido41:20
2.Poema Para Un Bello Nombre5:47
3.Vidala Del Silencio6:03
4.Fin De La Zafra4:34
5.Testimonio Final1:52



Atahualpa Yupanqui - L´Integrale, Vol. 5
(256 kbps, cover art included)

Freitag, 15. Dezember 2017

Daniel Viglietti - En Vivo desde Argentina 1971 - 1973 (1978) - Rest in peace!

Daniel Viglietti died October 30, 2017 in Montevideo at age 78 due to complications from surgery. Rest in peace!


Daniel Alberto Viglietti Indart (born 24 July 1939, Montevideo) is an Uruguayan folk singer, guitarist, composer, and political activist. He is one of the main exponents of Uruguayan popular song and also of the Nueva Canción or "New Song" of the 1960s and early 1970s.

He founded, in 1971, along with other musicians like José "Pepe" Guerra, Braulio López, the music scholar Coriún Aharonián (the only founding member who is still active), Myriam Dibarboure, María Teresa Sande and Notary Public Edgardo Bello, the recognized independent record label Ayuí/Tacuabé in order to promote and support valuable Uruguayan musical expressions.

He has performed the works of Cuban Nueva Trova stars Silvio Rodríguez and Pablo Milanés and Brazil's Chico Buarque and Edu Lobo, has worked with Cuban composer and arranger Leo Brouwer. His recordings are widely available, especially "Trópicos" (1972).

Viglietti was imprisoned in 1972 by his own government. He was supported by the likes of Jean-Paul Sartre as an international man of conscience, a voice for peace, and an opponent of the fascism and tyranny that plagued South America in the 1970s. Rumors about possible mistreatment against him forced the authorities to bring him out in front of television cameras to show that, in particular, his hands were fine. However, Viglietti spoke out that his treatment in police custody was much better than what other political prisoners received. He was a peer of the late Chilean poet and folk singer Victor Jara and composer and activist Violeta Parra.

Tracklist:
01. Nuestra Bandera [Daniel Viglietti] (2:53)
02. El diablo en el Paraíso [Violeta Parra] (2:47)
03. De noche en casa [Raimon – Trad. Daniel Viglietti] (2:28)
04. Vamos, Estudiantes (Del film “Me gustan los estudiantes”, Uruguay 1968) [Daniel Viglietti] (2:09)
05. Que no encuentre ni el rocío [Poema Quechua, traducido por S. Salazar Bondy – Daniel Viglietti] (2:28)
06. A desalambrar [Daniel Viglietti] (2:34)
07. Cielito del calabozo [Daniel Viglietti] (3:41)
08. Por todo Chile [Daniel Viglietti] (3:02)
09. Canción para mi América [Daniel Viglietti] (2:36)
10. Anaclara [Daniel Viglietti] (3:53)
11. Otra voz canta [Circe Maia – Daniel Viglietti] (2:55)
12. La senda está trazada [Jorge Salerno] (3:34)

Daniel Viglietti - En Vivo desde Argentina 1971 - 1973  (1978)
(256 kbps, cover art included)

Mittwoch, 13. Dezember 2017

Silvio Rodriguez - Antologia (1978)

Silvio Rodríguez Domínguez is a Cuban musician, and leader of the nueva trova movement.
He is considered Cuba's best folk singer and known for his highly eloquent and symbolic lyrics. Many of his songs have become classics in Latin American music, such as "Ojalá", "Playa Girón", "Unicornio" and "La maza". Among his other well-known songs are "Fusil contra fusil" and "Canción del Elegido". He has released nearly 20 albums.
Rodríguez, musically and politically, is a symbol of the Latin American Left. His lyrics are notably introspective, while his songs combine romanticism, eroticism, revolutionary politics and idealism. He has been referred to as "Cuba's John Lennon."

Rodríguez was born on November 29, 1946 in San Antonio de los Baños, a fertile valley in Havana Province known for its tobacco crop. He was raised in a family of poor farmers. His father, Víctor Dagoberto Rodríguez Ortega, was a farmer and amateur poet who supported socialist causes. His mother, Argelia Domínguez León, was a housewife. On many occasions Rodríguez has spoken how his love of music was developed by his mother, who would pass time singing boleros and songs from Santiago. Although Rodríguez had an uncle who played the bass, his mother had a far greater influence. Later, she also collaborated with him on a few musical works.

When the Revolution led by Fidel Castro triumphed in January 1959, Rodríguez was only 13 years old, and, like most Cubans of his generation, became involved in the new Revolutionary enthusiasm. He participated in the Literacy Campaign held in 1961, and then started working as a comics designer in a magazine. During this period a friend of his, Lázaro Fundora, taught him how to play the guitar.
Guitar playing took a major role in his life while he was doing his military service in the army, during 1964, but it wasn't until 1967, with his first television experience, that he started to become well known and influential among Cuban revolutionary youth. With pro-revolution yet very independent lyrics (together with his very informal dress code), Rodríguez soon attracted the animosity of some members of the new Culture Ministry, which was devoted to the eradication of the United States' influence in Cuban culture. In this context, a very important role was played by the cultural institution Casa de las Américas and its then director Haydée Santamaría, the former a respected revolutionary who participated in the Moncada barracks assault of 1953 and sister of Abel Santamaría, who was tortured and killed after the failure of the assault. Haydée Santamaría became a protective mother-figure of the young composers and of several of his colleagues at the time. Casa de las Américas became the home not only for the new Cuban trovadores but also for many other Latin Americans on the left. It was in this institution that Rodríguez met Pablo Milanés, and Noel Nicola, who along with Rodríguez would become the most famous nueva trova singers and composers.

In 1969, for almost five months, he worked as part of the crew on the fishing boat Playa Girón, and during this fertile episode he wrote 62 songs, among which are the famous "Ojalá" and "Playa Girón." The lyrics and music of these songs became a book named Canciones del Mar. In 1976, he decided to join Cuban troops in Angola, playing for the soldiers.

After more than 40 years of artistic work, Rodríguez has now written a vast number of songs and poems (said to be between 500 and more than one thousand), many of which have never been set to music and probably never will be. Although his musical knowledge has been continuously increasing (counting among his teachers the famous Cuban composer Leo Brouwer), he is more widely praised for the poetry in his songs than for the accompanying music. His lyrics are a staple of leftist culture throughout the whole Spanish-speaking world, and he has been banned from the media during several of the dictatorial regimes that ruled Latin America in the late 1970s and early 1980s.

His debut album was Días y flores, launched in 1975. Al final de este viaje and Cuando digo futuro feature songs he composed before Días y flores. He reached international popularity in the early 1980s with Rabo de nube and, in particular, Unicornio. In the early part of his career his work displayed a fair amount of revolutionary optimism. Mujeres, released in 1979, is in contrast a romantic and highly intimist album. In the middle of his career, Silvio Rodríguez experimented with sounds and rhythms departing from his trademark acoustic guitar, accompanied by the group Afrocuba (e.g. in Causas y azares). At maturity, Silvio Rodríguez thoroughly purified his sound through a return to acoustic guitar, great care and sophistication in the voice, and exclusive control of the production process from beginning to end. His lyrics became more introspective, at times even self-absorbed or self-justifying, expressing melancholic longings about the shortcomings of real-life socialism in Cuba while vindicating idealism and revolutionary hope amongst the youth. The trilogy, called Silvio, Rodríguez, and Domínguez (his first name, his father's last name, his mother's last name) displays sound artistic talent. The doubts, absent in the early part of his career, also correspond to the fall of communism worldwide and the so-called Special Period in Cuba. An unnoticed recurrent theme in the lyrics of the early part of his career is that of death, particularly although not only as associated with guerrilla warfare. In contrast to the explicitness of his early songs and political positions, there was a displacement of emphasis in his later years toward fantasy and dreams. Both, however, are about an alternative that is not present but is called for, or what Laclau would call a longing for a "missing fullness". This is true politically, romantically, and existentially. In a similar way, the unusual confessional tone of many of his songs allows for an unorthodox combination of transgression, eroticism, longing, and at times (probably accurate) self-deprecation in many of his lyrics.

The entire work of Silvio Rodríguez offers an intimate and introspective window into the life cycle of the artist. If the lyrics of the early part of his career are about revolutionary enthusiasm, love encounters and disappointments, as well as sensual desire, and if the middle-aged Silvio is more self-questioning, often looking backward; his most recent albums, such as Cita con ángeles, talk in part about his life as a grandfather and has a certain focus on children, while Érase que se era is the release (with all the means that come with being an established artist) of songs written early in his youth but never previously recorded. Mariposas also featured two classics composed in his youth.
Silvio Rodríguez stands out in the Spanish-speaking world for the intimacy and subtlety of his lyrics, as well as for his acoustic melodies and "chord picking." He is particularly popular amongst intellectual circles of the left in Latin America and Spain. He has also often served as Cuban cultural emissary in events of solidarity, whether in Chile (Silvio Rodríguez in Chile, 1991) or Argentina (En vivo en Argentina, recorded in 1984), both massive concerts given shortly after the fall of the right-wing dictatorships. Cuban flags are always conspicuous in the crowd during his concerts.
In 2007, he received a doctorate honoris causa from Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos in Peru.

Tracks:

01. Canción del Elegido (3:01)
02. Te doy una canción (3:09)
03. Madre (2:16)
04. Pequeña serenata diurna (2:53)
05. Mariposas (6:08)
06. El papalote (5:27)
07. Fusil contra fusil (3:15)
08. La era esta pariendo un corazón (2:57)
09. El rey de las flores (2:17)
10. Esto no es una elegía (3:25)

Silvio Rodriguez - Antologia (1978)
(256 kbsp, cover art included)

Montag, 11. Dezember 2017

Rip Rig + Panic ‎– I Am Cold (1982)

Named after a terrific '60s jazz album by Rahsaan Roland Kirk, "Rip Rig + Panic" answered the question: what happens when avant-garde post-punks collide head-long with a pop/soul singer and play a mutated form of jazz? A loosely knit collection of ex-Pop Group members (Gareth Sager and Bruce Smith) and young stars-to-be (Neneh Cherry), Rip, Rig & Panic formed in 1980 as quintessential avant-garde bohemians. They eschewed pop for a more primal, percussive foundation (slightly reggae, slightly Afro-pop) upon which was layered free jazz blowing and honking, soulful singing, and Cecil Taylor-inspired piano mania. But, as intense as this music was, it wasn't played with a dry academic seriousness; quite the contrary, Rip Rig + Panic were all about fun and playfulness. Even the song titles ("Constant Drudgery Is Harmful to Soul, Spirit & Health" and "Those Eskimo Women Speak Frankly") sounded more like surreal announcements than they did traditional, catchy song titles.

Arguably the most likable bunch of avant-garde types ever to record music, Rip Rig + Panic called it a day after three mostly wonderful, if somewhat inconsistent records. If your taste in music, even fringe music, is such that a strong melodic focus is necessary, than perhaps this won't be your cup of tea. However, if you don't mind a little chaos with your funk, then give this heady mix a chance; it will work its way into your heart, head, and feet. As for the members, Bruce Smith joined Public Image Ltd. for a spell, and Neneh Cherry became a huge pop star (deservedly so) with her first solo record.       

"I Am Cold" is the second studio album by Rip Rig + Panic, released in 18 June 1982. With additional help from ex-Slits singer Ari Upp and Cherry's stepfather, noted jazz trumpeter Don Cherry, "I Am Cold" is a slightly more mature work, but the exuberance and all-out craziness that marked their debut is here in full force. A little rambling, but an approach to music unlike one you've heard before.

Tracklist:
North Side:
Hunger (The Ocean Roars It Bites)3:00
Epi Epi Arp Woosh!4:00
Another Tampon Up The Arse Of Humanity4:00
Misa Luba Lone Wolf3:06
East Side:
Storm The Reality Asylum4:00
Here Gathers Nameless Energy (Volcanoes Covered By Snow)4:20
A Dog's Secret1:30
Liars Shape Up Or Ship Out2:00
South Side:
Warm; To The If In Life4:30
Nurse Increase The Sedatives (The Torment's No Better)4:15
Take A Don Key To Mystery4:00
West Side:
Tax Sex5:00
Subversive Wisdom5:00
Fire Eyes Joyful Silent Tears4:10

Rip Rig + Panic ‎– I Am Cold (1982)
(192 kbps, cover art included)
     

Sonntag, 10. Dezember 2017

The Sextet Of Orchestra USA - Mack The Knife And Other Berlin Theatre Songs Of Kurt Weill (1964)

Third Stream, Gunther Schuller's well-intentioned but commercially doomed idea of forcing contemporary classical (i.e. serial) composition music to cohabit with hard bop, produced but a handful of fine recordings, most notably the classic 1960 Atlantic Jazz Abstractions and this 1964 sextet outing under the stewardship of trombonist Michael Zwerin.

The choice of Kurt Weill's sleek and elegant compositions was astute: the bittersweet harmonies of Weill (who ultimately emigrated to the U.S. from Germany) lend themselves particularly well to jazz soloing, and accordingly, an outstanding rhythm section featuring the Modern Jazz Quartet's John Lewis (an enthusiastic advocate of Third Stream from its inception) and Connie Kay. Bassist Richard Davis is on hand to support some splendid horn work from Thad Jones, Nick Travis, Jerome Richardson, and most notably Eric Dolphy, whose wild bass clarinet leaps on "Alabama Song" are a pure joy to hear, and proof that the saxophonist's harmonic concept, while undeniably "out" for the standard-based harmonic repertoire of bop, was most definitely "in" the wider scheme of musical thought that Third Stream aspired to.               

Tracklist:

1 Alabama Song 5:22
2 Havanna Song 6:16
3 As You Make Your Bed 5:26
4 Mack The Knife 5:04
5 Bilbao Song 3:47
6 Barbara Song 5:04
7 Pirate Jenny 3:34
8 Mack The Knife (Alternate Take) 4:50
9 Bilbao Song (Alternate Take) 3:45
10 Pirate Jenny (Alternate Take) 4:23


The Sextet Of Orchestra USA - Mack The Knife And Other Berlin Theatre Songs Of Kurt Weill (1964)
(320 kbps, cover art included)

Samstag, 9. Dezember 2017

Joe Gibbs & The Professionals‎ – African Dub - Chapter 2

The second volume in this vintage four-disc series of instrumental dub from Joe Gibbs' studio finds him still working with members of the Soul Syndicate and We the People bands, and utilizing the formidable mixing talents of Errol Thompson.

What sets this volume somewhat apart from the other three is the number of rhythms it carries over from the rocksteady era: "Chapter Two" is a remix of the Techniques' late-'60s classic "Queen Majesty"; "Peeping Tom" reworks the Melodians' "You Have Caught Me"; and "My Best Dub" is an instrumental and nicely dubbed-up recut of the early Wailers track "Hypocrites." But it also includes some heavyweight rockers and one-drop material, including "Angola Crisis" (based on a familiar rhythm later used for such roots reggae hits as "Uptown Top Ranking" and "Three Piece Suit") and an absolutely brilliant dub mix of Bob Andy's "Chained," here rendered in dark, minimalist tones with drastic dubwise effects and retitled "Third World."

Along with the third volume, this is one of the most impressive of the four discs in the African Dub series.                

Tracklist:
1Chapter Two
2The Marriguna Affair
3Angola Crisis
4Peeping Tom
5Outrage
6Idlers Rest
7My Best Dub
8Third World
9Heavy Duty Dub
10Musical Arena
11Mackarus Serenade
12Jamaican Grass


Joe Gibbs & The Professionals‎ – African Dub - Chapter 2                                   
(320 kbps, cover art included)

Samstag, 25. November 2017

Jorge Ben - África Brasil (1976)

This 1976 album is undoubtedly one of the greatest classics of Brazilian popular music, with Jorge Ben mixing funky samba, Afro-Brazilian beats, and crunching guitars to create one of the most fascinating sounds ever recorded in Brazil.

The album kicks off with the raw, energetic "Ponta de Lança Africano," and from there on it never slows down, but continues to pile up one fiery, funky gem after the other. The samba soul and samba funk scenes of the '70s in Brazil produced many great artists and many great recordings, fully comparable with the best soul and funk music recorded in the U.S. during the same period. Jorge Ben was the most prominent figure of this scene and "África Brasil" is probably the most famous of his '70s recordings. For any person who is interested in the music of Jorge Ben, or indeed Brazilian funk in general, there is no better sample of it than "África Brasil".

Tracklist:

A1Ponta De Lança Africano (Umbabarauma)3:58
A2Hermes Trismegisto Escreveu3:04
A3O Filósofo3:30
A4Meus Filhos, Meu Tesouro3:53
A5O Plebeu3:18
A6Taj Mahal3:10
B1Xica Da Silva4:00
B2A História De Jorge3:53
B3Camisa 10 Da Gávea4:18
B4Cavaleiro Do Cavalo Imaculado4:43
B5África Brasil (Zumbi)3:48

Jorge Ben - África Brasil (1976)
(320 kbps, cover art included)             

Dienstag, 21. November 2017

Nina Simone - Broadway Blues Ballads (1964)

There's a lot more Broadway and a lot more ballads than blues on this, which ranks as one of her weaker mid-'60s albums. Almost half the record features Broadway tunes on the order of Cole Porter and Rodgers & Hammerstein; most of the rest was composed by Bennie Benjamin, author of her first-rate "Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood," which the Animals covered for a hit shortly afterwards (and which leads off this record).

The other Benjamin tunes are modified uptown soul with string arrangements and backup vocals in the vein of "Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood," but aren't in the same league, although "How Can I?" is an engaging cha cha. Besides "Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood," the album is most notable for the great "See-Line Woman," a percolating call-and-response number that ranks as one of her best tracks. The CD reissue includes the strange bonus cut "The Monster," an odd attempt at a soul novelty tune.


  1. "Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood" (Bennie Benjamin, Gloria Caldwell, Sol Marcus) - 2:48
  2. "Night Song" (Lee Adams, Charles Strouse) - 3:06
  3. "The Laziest Gal in Town" (Cole Porter) - 2:19
  4. "Something Wonderful" (Oscar Hammerstein II, Richard Rodgers) - 2:46
  5. "Don't Take All Night" (Bennie Benjamin, Sol Marcus) - 2:54
  6. "Nobody" (Alex Rogers, Bert Williams) - 4:18
  7. "I Am Blessed" (Bennie Benjamin, Sol Marcus) - 2:57
  8. "Of This I'm Sure" (Bennie Benjamin, Sol Marcus) - 2:37
  9. "See-Line Woman" ([traditional] American folk, George Bass, Nina Simone) - 2:38
  10. "Our Love (Will See Us Through)" (Bennie Benjamin, Sol Marcus) - 3:01
  11. "How Can I?" (Bennie Benjamin, Sol Marcus) - 2:05
  12. "The Last Rose of Summer" (Thomas Moore, Richard Alfred Milliken, Nina Simone) - 3:08
  13.  "A Monster" is added as a bonus track. (Bennie Benjamin, Sol Marcus) - 2:47
Nina Simone - Broadway Blues Ballads (1964)
(320 kbps, cover art included)

Montag, 13. November 2017

Georges Brassens - Don Juan - Vol. 12 (1976)

One of French pop's most poetic songwriters, Georges Brassens was also a highly acclaimed and much-beloved performer in his own right. Not only a brilliant manipulator of language and a feted poet in his own right, Brassens was also renowned for his subversive streak, satirizing religion, class, social conformity, and moral hypocrisy with a wicked glee. Yet beneath that surface was a compassionate concern for his fellow man, particularly the disadvantaged and desperate.

His personal politics were forged during the Nazi occupation, and while his views on freedom bordered on anarchism, his songs expressed those convictions more subtly than those of his contemporary, Léo Ferré.

Though he was a skilled songwriter, Brassens had little formal musical training, and he generally kept things uncomplicated - simple melodies and spare accompaniment from a bass and second guitar.

Along with Jacques Brel, he became one of the most unique voices on the French cabaret circuit, and exerted a tremendous influence on many other singers and songwriters of the postwar era. His poetry and lyrics are still studied as part of France's standard educational curriculum.       

"Don Juan" was officially his final album.

Tracklist:

1 Trompe La Mort
2 Les Ricochets
3 Tempête Dans Un Bénitier
4 Le Boulevard Du Temps Qui Passe
5 Le Modeste
6 Don Juan
7 Les Casseuses
8 Cupidon S'En Fout
9 Montélimar
10 Histoire De Faussaire
11 La Messe Au Pendu
12 Lèche-Cocu
13 Les Patriotes
14 Mélanie
Bonus :
15 Les Copains D'Abord
16 La Visite
17 Élégie À Un Rat De Cave

Georges Brassens - Don Juan - Vol. 12 (1976)
(ca. 192 kbps, cover art included)

Sonntag, 12. November 2017

Elizabeth Cotten ‎- Freight Train And Other North Carolina Folk Songs And Tunes (1958)

Elizabeth "Libba" Cotten (1895-1987), best known for her timeless song "Freight Train," built her musical legacy on a firm foundation of late 19th- and early 20th-century African-American instrumental traditions. Through her songwriting, her quietly commanding personality, and her unique left-handed guitar and banjo styles, she inspired and influenced generations of younger artists. In 1984 Cotten was declared a National Heritage Fellow by the National Endowment for the Arts and was later recognized by the Smithsonian Institution as a "living treasure." She received a Grammy Award in 1985 when she was ninety, almost eighty years after she first began composing her own works.

Recorded in 1957 and early 1958 by Mike Seeger, "Freight Train and Other North Carolina Folk Songs and Tunes" collects the influential debut sides cut by a then-62-year-old Elizabeth Cotten; even decades after their first release, they remain a veritable primer in the art of finger-picked style guitar playing. The quaint, homespun quality of the material - much of it recorded at Cotten's home with her grandchildren looking on in silence - adds immensely to its intimacy and warmth; the sound quality varies wildly from track to track, but the amazing instrumental work shines through regardless on tracks like the opening "Wilson Rag" and the now-standard "Freight Train."               


Tracklist:

1 Wilson Rag 1:35
2 Freight Train 2:42
3 Going Down The Road Feeling Bad 2:09
4 I Don't Love Nobody 1:10
5 Ain't Got No Honey Baby Now 0:53
6 Graduation March 2:29
7 Honey Babe Your Papa Cares For You 2:11
8 Vastopol 2:08
9 Here Old Rattler Here / Sent For My Fiddle Sent For My Bow / George Buck 3:45
10 Run…Run / Mama Your Son Done Gone 2:15
11 Sweet Bye And Bye / What A Friend We Have In Jesus 3:00
12 Oh Babe It Ain't No Lie 4:40
13 Spanish Flang Dang 2:49
14 When I Get Home 2:21

Elizabeth Cotten ‎- Freight Train And Other North Carolina Folk Songs And Tunes (1958)
(320 kbps, cover art included)                                 

Samstag, 11. November 2017

Berlin - Großstadtklänge - Rare Schellacks 1908 - 1953

Here´s another volume of the series with rare schellack recordings, this time collecting historic recordings of Berlin performers from 1908 - 1953.

Throughout the world, the rise of mass culture in the 19th century brought the music of the common man to the forefront of the popular agenda.
Expressions of "high culture" no longer dominated in the big cities. The taste of recently-urbanised country migrants was increasingly catered for.
Since the turn of the 20th century popular melodies, folk songs, humorous commentaries and dance music with a hard edge gained widespread acceptance.

In the suburbs of Vienna, Berlin, Munich, Leipzig and Dresden new types of urban folk singers and entertainers emerged at the cutting edge of recreation.

Their songs reflected the dissonant and raucous reality of urban life in harsh and critical lyrics, but always modified by a pinch of irony and a considerable amount of humor. The commercial recording industry recognized the mass appeal of these emergent syncretic forms and a representative sample from that early period, recorded in Berlin, is featured on this compilation.

Tracklist
1Paul BendixDie Radiorevue 'Der neue Lautsprecher'0:54
2Unknown ArtistDas war knorke1:37
3Schorsch Ruselli mit OrchesterbegleitungDas Mädchen vom Weissensee2:53
4Erwin HartungMöbel-Hübner-Marsch2:44
5Otto ReutterSeh'n Sie, darum ist es schade, dass der Krieg zu Ende ist2:15
6Alexander Flessburg, KrückeSportpalast-Walzer3:25
7Bully Buhlan und Peter RebhuhnChattanooga Choo Choo II (Kötschenbroda-Express)2:15
8Arnold Rieck und Rosi LoibnerIm Lustgarten ist Frühkonzert2:35
9Ludwig ArnoPaula mach die Bluse zu2:49
10Paul BendixFräulein Backhaus2:57
11Paul BendixRadiorevue Ausschnitt0:12
12Pola NegriZeig' der Welt nicht dein Herz2:54
13Max HansenRobes Modes3:09
14Claire WaldoffClaire Waldoff spricht...!0:52
15Claire WaldoffDie Radpartie2:50
16Otto ReutterO Du liebes, deutsches Gretchen3:43
17Die Drei Travellers08/15 Cocktail3:00
18Jugendchor des Mitteldeutschen Rundfunks LeipzigBaut Berlin2:21
19MargareteMax hat'n Knax2:10
20Gustav Schönwald und Elsa GüdeIm Berliner Zoo2:42
21Marta HübnerInventur Ausverkauf3:10
22Homocord OrchesterIch möcht' ein Würstchen, mit Senf beschmiert2:36
23Alexander FlessburgDas Neue Tempelhof Lied (Was hab'n wir für 'ne Feuerwehr bei uns in Tempelhof)2:49
24Claire WaldoffWie wohl ist mir am Wochenend2:51
25No ArtistDie Wasserminna (Verlagsankündigung)0:57
26Max HansenIch reiß mir eine Wimper aus3:07
27Claire WaldoffIch kann um Zehne nicht nach Hause geh'n3:00
28Paul GraetzBerlin2:53
29Paul BendixRadiorevue Ausschnitt0:32


Berlin - Großstadtklänge - Rare Schellacks 1908 1953
(256 kbps, cover art included)

Donnerstag, 9. November 2017

Paul Dessau - Lilo Herrmann - An die Mütter und an die Lehrer - Der anachronistische Zug (NOVA)


Liselotte Hermann was a German student who became involved in anti-Nazi activities. She was arrested and sentenced to death for high treason, becoming the first woman to be executed in Hitler's
Third Reich.

She was an engineer’s daughter and had a middle-class liberal upbringing. After completing her Abitur, she went to work in a chemical factory to support her studies in chemistry, starting in 1929, and later also in biology as of 1931. She took these programmes at the Technische Hochschule Stuttgart (now the University of Stuttgart) and the University of Berlin. She joined the Kommunistischer Jugendverband Deutschlands (“Communist Youth Federation of Germany”) in 1928 or 1930, and also became a member of the Roter Studentenbund (“Red Students’ League”). From 1931, she was a member of the Communist Party of Germany (KPD).

Early in 1933, she signed a “Call for the Defence of Democratic Rights and Freedoms” at the university in Berlin, and was therefore, together with 111 other students, reprimanded and debarred by the university on 11 July 1933. From that time, she worked illegally against Germany's fascist dictatorship. On 20 December 1933, her husband was slain in Gestapo custody.
She took a job as a nanny and socialized with the armed resistance within the KPD. In 1934, Liselotte's son Walter was born. From September of the same year, she lived once again in Stuttgart, where she worked as a shorthand typist at her father's engineering office.
She reestablished contacts with the now banned KPD. From late 1934, she worked as a technical aid with Stefan Lovasz, the Württemberg KPD leader. She obtained from Arthur Göritz information about secret weapons projects - munitions production at the Dornier factory in Friedrichshafen and the building of another, underground munitions factory near Celle - which she relayed to the KPD's office that had been set up in Switzerland.

On 7 December 1935, Liselotte Hermann was seized. For 19 harrowing months she was held in remand custody, whilst her young son had to be cared for by his grandparents. Charged before the Volksgerichtshof, Herrmann was sentenced to death by the Second Senate of the Volksgerichtshof in Stuttgart on 12 June 1937 for "treason and conspiracy to commit high treason". Lina Haag was held in the same Remand Prison at that time, and remembers the night she was sentenced in her book 'A Handful of Dust' or 'How Long the Night'.
After a year in the Berlin Women's Prison, she was transferred to Plötzensee Prison, also in Berlin, for execution. Despite international protests, Liselotte Hermann was sent to the guillotine on 20 June 1938. Her political friends Stefan Lovasz, Josef Steidle and Arthur Göritz were also put to death the same day.

In East Germany, many schools, streets, and institutions were named after her, but after German reunification in 1990, many were given new names in the rush to erase all references to Communism.
Indeed, even in Stuttgart, where Liselotte Herrmann studied, she has been a controversial figure. In 1988, unknown persons placed a simple memorial stone to her on the University of Stuttgart campus, which caused a bit of a stir. "Lilo-Herrmann-Weg" was the city's tribute to her, but it is little more than a 100 m-long blind alley affording access to public and private parking. No-one lives there. In the 1970s, students at the university tried to get a new residence named after her, but the university administration balked at the idea.

The German writer Friedrich Wolf worked after the World War I as a doctor in Remscheid and Hechingen, where he focused on care for common people and prescribed treatment using naturopathic medicine. In 1923 and 1925 his sons Markus und Konrad were born. After 1928 he became a member of the Communist Party and the Association of Proletarian-Revolutionary Authors. In 1929 his drama "Cyankali" sparked a debate about abortion, and he was briefly arrested and charged for performing abortions.
In early 1932 he founded the Spieltrupp Südwest in Stuttgart, a communist agitprop group of lay actors that created controversial pieces about current topics.
After the Nazis came to power, Wolf emigrated with his family to Moscow. In 1938 he made his way to Spain to work as a doctor in the International Brigades. However, he was arrested in France and interned in the concentration camp Le Vernet. In 1941 he gained Soviet citizenship and returned to Moscow where he became a founder of the National Committee for a Free Germany (NKFD) .
In 1945 he returned to Germany and was active in literary and cultural-political issues. From 1949 to 1951 he was the first ambassador of East Germany to Poland. On October 5, 1953, he died in his personal office in Lehnitz.

Friedrich Wolf wrote the biographic poem "Lilo Herrmann", which was set to music in 1954 by the German conductor and composer Paul Dessau. This album features his melodrama for speaker, chorus & ensemble "Lilo Herrmann" besides "An die Mütter und an die Lehrer" and "Der anachronistische Zug", a collaboration with Bertolt Brecht.

Paul Dessau - Lilo Herrmann - An die Mütter und an die Lehrer - Der anachronistische Zug (NOVA)
(320 kbps, vinyl rip, small front cover included)

VA - Klangdenkmal für die Opfer des Holocaust - A Monument in Sound for the Victims of the Holocaust (2004)

Today we remember the anti-Jewish pogrom in Nazi Germany and Austria on 9 to 10 November1938, also known as "Novemberpogrome", "Reichskristallnacht", "Reichspogromnacht" or "Pogromnacht" in German.

Twenty six variations on a subject that one finds difficult to put into words. The incomprehensibility and the magnitude of the Holocaust can perhaps be described in facts, dates and figures - but the suffering of the victims, the regret about what happened, the consequence is especially difficult to "grasp" in terms of one´s owen life. Perhaps this is the reason for music as music is "the ability to communicate where speech has ended" (R. M. Rilke) and gives us the possivility of combining emotions and reason without a verbal setting, to allow grief and hope to flow into each other and in this manner to remember the victims in a very special way.

The "Monument in Sound for the Vicitms of the Holocaust" has been "built" by 27 composers who belong to the "Deutsche Komponistenverband" (German Association of Composers). The project was initiated in 1999 following a unanimous resolution passed by the associations´s state branch in Berlin. Composers from a variety of generations and artistic origins are involved and the starting point was the theme of a song by Coco Schumann. He was persecuted as the son of a Jewish mother and deported to the concentration camps Theresienstadt, Auschwitz and Dachau - he survived these camps and still performs on stage to this very day.

The theme of his compositon was arranged for a string quartet setting and sent to all the project´s participants in alphabetical order, one after another. Each artist then had the possibility, whilst taking the opening theme into consideration, to take up from his predecessor in terms of compostion or to carry on independatly ins or her own way. As such, after two years work, an astonishingly homogeneous musical piece of contemporary history came into being, contrary to all doubts, created by artist from a variety of musical fields - from jazz, avant garde and serious music. A musical work in which past and present flow into a spiritual entirety, as the sum of the involved composers´ personal and subjecitve experiences, each being treated in their own individual artistic manner.


VA - Klangdenkmal für die Opfer des Holocaust (2004)
(256 kbps, cover art included)

Dienstag, 31. Oktober 2017

VA - Wien - Zoten und Pikanterien - Rare Schellacks 1906 - 1932

Throughout the world, the rise of mass culture in the 19th century brought the music of the common man to the forefront of the popular agenda. Expressions of "high culture" no longer dominated in the big cities. The taste of recently-urbanised country migrants was increasingly catered for.

Since the turn of the 20th century popular melodies, folk songs, humorous commentaries and dance music with a hard edge gained widespread acceptance. In the suburbs of Vienna, Berlin, Munich, Leipzig and Dresden new types of urban folk singers and entertainers emerged at the cutting edge of recreation. Their songs reflected the dissonant and raucous reality of urban life in harsh and critical lyrics, but always modified by a pinch of irony and a considerable amount of humor.

The commercial recording industry recognized the mass appeal of these emergent syncretic forms and a representative sample from that early period is featured on this series.

Tracklist:
Die Erbsünd - Freddy Wellmann
Der Grillenkitzler - Karl Huber mit Lenz Quartett
Brombeerlied - Franz Niernsee mit Lenz Quartett
Der Pfannenflicker - Brder Breier mit "Neuwirth" Quartett
Wiener Lokal-Verse - Franz Mika mit Neustifter Schrammel Begleitung
Das Lied ist modern - Scheimbauer & Lenz mit Mojka-Nast Schrammelbegleitung
Roserl, wie schön bist du im Hoserl - Richard Waldemar mit Klavier Begleitung
Weil ich anstnädig bin - Fritzi Rolly mit Orchesterbegleitung
Im roten Hahn - Franz Mika mit original Lanner-Quartett
Die Müllerin - Jungbauer mit Lenz-Quartett
Wo's Wasser herrauscht - Franz Niernsee mit Schrammelquartett "Lenz"
Breier G'stanzeln - August Breier begleitet vom "Neuwirth-Quartett"
Stilleben - Mika und Drechsler mit Schrammelbegleitung "Pischinger"
Hansi Führer am Telefon - Hansi Fhrer mit Klavierbegleitung
Schnauzbart-G'stanzln - Karl Huber mit Butschetty-Quartett
I hab mei Freud mit die Vögln - Mika & Drechsler mit Schrammel-Terzett
Unterm Paraplui - Rudi Hermann mit Schrammel-Terzett
Der Landkirtag - Scheimbauer & Lenz mit Schrammelquartett Moja-Nast
Bauerng'stanzeln - Karl Huber mit "Quartett Lenz und Ernst"
Beim Heurigen in Ottakring - Mika & Drechsler mit Schrammelbegleitung "Pischinger"
Laternderl - Franz Niernsee begl. Vom Wiener Salon Orchester "D`Geigerbuben"
I hab an alten Daimler - Rudi Hermann mit Schrammel-Terzett
Das Vergissmeinnicht - Franz Mika mit Original-Lanner-Quartett
Bauerng'stanzeln - Rudolf Heller mit Klavierbegleitung
Brunnstangl - Lenz und Scheimbauer mit Schrammelbegleitung

VA - Wien - Zoten und Pikanterien - Rare Schellacks 1906 - 1932
(192 kbps, cover art included)

Montag, 30. Oktober 2017

Django Reinhardt et son Quintette du HCF - Concert A Bruxelles 1948

From the liner notes:

"This is a recording in which every Django Reinhardt admirer will be interested. It is the only public performance we know and it had been recorded on an amateur tape recorder he bought in Brussels.

When Mrs. Reinhardt played it to us after Django´s death, we immediately thought that such a rarity had to be issued, although the recording quality is poor.

So here is Django Reinhardt with his quintet on the stage of the Theatre des Galeries in Burssels in December 1948 featuring Hubert Rostaing, Louis Vola, Arthur Motta and his older son Henri "Louson" Baumgartner."



Tracklist:

A1Artillerie Lourde4:19
A2Micro1:57
A3Bolero3:57
A4Cadillac Slim2:43
A5Nuages3:44
B1Place De Broukere2:49
B2Improvisation2:28
B3Improvisation Sur Un Theme Mineur4:20
B4Festival 481:48
B5Minor Swing2:17

Django Reinhardt et son Quintette du HCF - Concert A Bruxelles 1948
(320 kbps, cover art included)

Dienstag, 24. Oktober 2017

Joshua White & His Carolinians - Chaing Gang (1940)

Most blues enthusiasts think of Josh White as a folk revival artist. It's true that the second half of his music career found him based in New York playing to the coffeehouse and cabaret set and hanging out with Burl Ives, Woody Guthrie, and fellow transplanted blues artists Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee. When I saw him in Chicago in the 1960s his shirt was unbuttoned to his waist à la Harry Belafonte and his repertoire consisted of folk revival standards such as "Scarlet Ribbons." He was a show business personality — a star renowned for his sexual magnetism and his dramatic vocal presentations. What many people don't know is that Josh White was a major figure in the Piedmont blues tradition. The first part of his career saw him as apprentice and lead boy to some of the greatest blues and religious artists ever, including Willie Walker, Blind Blake, Blind Joe Taggart (with whom he recorded), and allegedly even Blind Lemon Jefferson. On his own, he recorded both blues and religious songs, including a classic version of "Blood Red River." A fine guitar technician with an appealing voice, he became progressively more sophisticated in his presentation. Like many other Carolinians and Virginians who moved north to urban areas, he took up city ways, remaining a fine musician if no longer a down-home artist. Like several other canny blues players, he used his roots music to broaden and enhance his life experience, and his talent was such that he could choose the musical idiom that was most lucrative at the time.
- Barry Lee Pearson, AMG

"Chain Gang" was a set of four 78rpm records recorded June 4, 1940 in New York City and released in the same year by Columbia with the follwing tracks:

- Chain Gang Boun'
- Nine Foot Shovel

- Trouble
- Goin' Home Boys

- Cryin' Who Cryin' You (part 1)
- Cryin' Who Cryin' You (part 2)

- Told My Cap'n
- Jerry

"Chain Gang" was produced for Columbia records in 1940, under the sponsorship of John Hammond, and within the next year Josh would become ubiquitous in the leftist folk music world. He was singing on Alan Lomax’s CBS radio programs, and acting as accompanist and sometimes vocalist for the Almanac Singers, the loose-knit group of agit-prop folkies centered around Pete Seeger, Lee Hayes, Fred Hellerman, and often Woody Guthrie. Featuring a vocal group called the Carolinians that included White's brother Bill and future civil rights leader Bayard Rustin, "Chain Gang" moved White's music further in the direction of pointed social commentary.

From the liner notes:
"Columbia Records proudly presents what is perhaps the most genuine folk music of our times...seven Negro laments of the chain gang sung by Joshua White and his Carolinians"

(192 kbps, front cover included)