Sonntag, 9. November 2014

Leipziger Synagogalchor - Jewish Chants And Songs - Jüdische Gesänge

Today we remember the anti-Jewish pogrom in Nazi Germany and Austria on 9 to 10 November1938, also known as "Novemberpogrome", "Reichskristallnacht", "Reichspogromnacht" or "Pogromnacht" in German.

Within living memory music always played a key role as mediator between the nations.
The Synagogue Choir of Leipzig sees its goal in the preservation of synagogue music as well as of Yiddish and Hebrew folk songs by performing the compositions in free arrangements.
The ensemble, which consists of singers of non-Jewish origin, is unique in Europe. It celebrated its 40th anniversary in 2002.
Today as well as in the future the dedication of the Synagogue Choir will be the support of peace, tolerance, and cultural communication between the nations by giving converts all over the world.

The Leipziger Synagogalchor was founded in 1962. Its aim is to cultivate the Jewish music tradition, in particular that of synagogal music of the 19th and 20th centuries as well as Yiddish and Hebrew folklore. Its extensive repertoire of historical literature preserves a cultural heritage which is performed by no other European ensemble in this form. Thus the choir is often called upon to present this part of the cultural and musical history of the Jewish folk to audiences not only in Germany but also world-wide. Increasingly, concert programs also include contemporary compositions of composers such as Joseph Dorfman, Bonia Shur and Siegfried Thiele.
Four records produced by ETERNA, two by MDR and a CD recorded by Berlin Classics offer a representative cross-section of repertoire and demonstrate the professional format of the ensemble.
The combination of artistic and political expression, both weighted equally, in the works interpreted by the Leipziger Synagogalchor under the direction of Kammersänger Helmut Klotz has established the ensemble as a concert-choir which is celebrated world-wide and which serves as a politico-cultural embassador of considerable importance for the city of Leipzig and the state of Saxony.
The Leipziger Synagogalchor has received the golden award “Stern der Völkerfreundschaft“ and the “Kunstpreis“ of the city of Leipzig.
The choir became a registered association in 1991 and receives subsidies from the city of Leipzig and the state of Saxony.
The ensemble has approximately 30 members who are not professional singers but who for the most part have received some professional training. They have diverse occupations and dedicate a large part of their free time to choral music. The personal commitment and idealism of every single member contribute in large part to the success of the ensemble.
In the 30 years Helmut Klotz has been artistic director, he has succeeded in forming the choir into a semi-professional ensemble with a professional artistic scope. This is evident when one sees where the ensemble performs internationally and which acclaimed soloists and orchestras it works with. This choir has the special privilege to perform with solists of the Leipzig, Berlin and Zurich Operas and with members of the Gewandhaus Orchestra and the Radio Orchestra of Middlegermany (MDR) in concert halls such as that of the Berlin Philharmonic, the Berlin “Schauspielhaus“, the “Gasteig“ in Munich, the Leipzig “Gewandhaus“ and the “Alte Oper“ in Frankfurt. Furthermore, the choir has been on concert tours to Israel, South Africa, Spain, Portugal, Belgium, Brazil, Slovakia and several times in Poland and the U.S.A. The choir has performed at international festivals for Jewish culkture and music in Odessa, Leverkusen and Munich. A special occasion for the choir was the performance of the international opera production “Der Weg der Verheißung“ of Kurt Weill in Chemnitz, New York and Tel Aviv.
In its hometown Leipzig the ensemble performs twice a year in the series “Leipziger Ware“. Here it is presented through the Ephraim Carlebach Foundation in the “Alte Handelsbörse“. For 25 years it has also taken part in the annual ecumenical service in the Leipzig Church of St. Thomas in memory of the victims of the “Reichsprogromnacht“ November 9, 1938.

This album features recordings from 1983.
Tracklist:

01. Tauraß adaunoj 3:54
02. Ham'chabe eß hamer 6:27
03. Lochen ßomach libi 2:54
04. Ez chajim 2:52
05. Schir hamaalauß 2:26
06. Towau l'fonecho 2:39
07. Naariz'cho 7:36
08. Lomir sich iberbetn 1:52
09. Scha, still 4:10
10. Nigun g-moll 0:56
11. Du sollst nischt gehn 3:20
12. Her nor, du schejn Mejdele 3:43
13. Hages 1:14
14. Itzik hat schojn Chaßene gehot 3:32
15. Wie trinkt der Keßer Tee 5:17

Leipziger Synagogalchor - Jewish Chants And Songs - Jüdische Gesänge
(256 kbps, front cover included)

Mittwoch, 15. Oktober 2014

GDR Subculture Vol. 5: Krakatit Radio Lora Schweiz 11.10.89 DDR Fluechtlinge `89

Radio LoRa is an alternative local radio station in the Swiss. On October 11, 1989 Radio Lora broadcasted a program about refugees from the GDR, featuring music by GDR alternative bands like Hard Pop, Die Skeptiker, Feeling B, Herr Blum, AG Geige, Heinz & Franz, Die Art and others.



Thanks a lot to Tape Attack for the original posting.

Krakatit Radio Lora Schweiz 11.10.89 DDR Fluechtlinge `89
(192 kbps, artwork included)

Dienstag, 30. September 2014

GDR Subculture, Vol. 3: "Bleibe im Lande und wehre dich täglich - Streiflichter auf die DDR-Rockszene" - Radio-Broadcast about "DDR Rock" (26.09.1989, Musicbox, Swiss)

The radio-broadcast "Bleibe im Lande und wehre dich täglich -  Streiflichter auf die DDR-Rockszene" from "Musicbox", a Swiss radio programm, is a very interesting document reporting about the GDR music scene in the year of the fall of the wall.
 Broadcasted 25 years ago, the feature combines music and interviews with memebers from bands like Big Savod, Tausend Tonnen Obst, Herr Blum, Die Anderen and Herbst in Peking. The musicians talk about the situation in the GDR music scene, about making compromises with the established system, about music between East and West, about politics and the ongoing changes in the GDR society.

Thanks to Tape Attack for this intimate impressions from the GDR music scene in the year 1989.

"Bleibe im Lande und wehre dich täglich - Streiflichter auf die DDR-Rockszene" (26.09.1989)
(192 kbps)

Donnerstag, 18. September 2014

Louis Killen - Ballads & Broadsides (Topic, 1965)

A dynamic singer of great individuality and integrity, Louis Killer has long been regarded as one of the most influential musicians of the mid-Twentieth century British folk revival.

Born and raised in the heart of the industrial North East of England of Irish descent, Killen grew up in a musical family and carne early to a love of folk music. In 1958 he founded "Folk Song and Ballad, Newcastle" - one of the first folk clubs in Britain. He recorded two EPs for Topic in 1962 - and Northumbrian Garland. The following year he participated in the Trade Union sponsored "Centre 42" concerts, which led to an invitation from A L Lloyd to contribute to the important themed collections "The Iron Muse", "Farewell Nancy" and "Tommy Armstrong of Tyneside".

Louis Killen's first full-length solo recording, "Ballads & Broadsides", was published in 1965. The recording sessions look place in Bill Leader's Camden Town flat, when Killen was just thirty and had been a professional musician for two years. The album is a classic; one of the first solo recordings from Killen's generation of revivalists and has been an important influence on younger singers for over four decades.

Tracklist:
01 Young Edwin in the Lowlands
02 As we were a-saìling
03 The flying cloud
04 All things are quite silent
05 One may morning
06 The cock
07 The bramble briar
08 Thorneymoor woods
09 The banks of sweet Primeroses

Louis Killen: vocals, concertina

Louis Killen - Ballads & Broadsides (1965)
(ca. 192 kbps, cover art included)

Freitag, 8. August 2014

Gone Fishin!

…so, no blog posts in the next two weeks.  Have a good time, greetings!

Donnerstag, 31. Juli 2014

Harun Farocki is dead - Rest in peace!

Renowned German filmmaker and video artist Harun Farocki died on Wednesday at 70-years-old. Galerie Ropac confirmed the artist’s passing to the German magazine Monopol.The gallery has represented Farocki since 2007.
 
Born in 1944 in present day Czechoslovakia, but what was then part of Germany, the artist make over 90 films during his lifetime. He studied at the German Academy of Film and Television from 1966 to 1968, developing a unique documentary style that was deeply critical of the media and ways in which images have shaped contemporary life and ideology.
 
From 1974 to 1984 Harocki served as the editor of Munich-based film journal Filmkritik. He moved to California during the 1990s where he taught at UC Berkeley. Farocki began greater engagement with the art world in the 2000s. He took part in Documenta 12, presenting Deep Play (2007), which broke down footage from the 2006 World Cup, held in Germany, across 12 monitors.
 
He has enjoyed solo museum shows at Berlin’s Hamburger Bahnhof, the Tel Aviv Museum of Art, New York’s MoMA, Cologne’s Museum Ludwig, and London’s Tate Modern, among others.
Aside from Galerie Ropac, Farocki is represented by Galerie Barbara Weiss in Berlin and Greene Naftali Gallery in New York.
 
Maybe you want to check out some of his films on the wonderful Arsenevich blog.

Sonntag, 27. Juli 2014

Word, Brass & Steel - Same (1976)

The disco group Wood, Brass & Steel recorded a selftitled album for Turbo/All Platinum Records, the label of Sylvia and Joe Robinson, in 1976.

The album spawned a pair of minor hits in the form of "Always There" (a Ronnie Laws cover that did well in the U.K.). Bassist Doug Wimbish and guitarist Skip McDonald played a lot of music together, in clubs and colleges around New York, New Jersey, Connecticut and Massachusetts.

Three years after that, Skip and Doug teamed up with Keith LeBlanc and they became the house band for the Robinsons’ new label, Sugar Hill Records. The trio subsequently played on seminal early rap hits such as The Message and White Lines (Don’t Do It) with Grandmaster Flash.
Later they relocated to the U.K. and formed Tackhead as well as Fats Comet with Adrian Sherwood.   

Tracklist:

Funkanova5:35
My Darling Baby4:00
Theme Song3:00
Working On A Dream3:04
Say What You Want To Say3:37
Same Ol' Me3:25
My Lady3:25
Without You6:30
Welcome To The Party3:30
Always There5:25


Word, Brass & Steel - Same (1976)       
(320 kbps, front cover included)       

Freitag, 25. Juli 2014

Nina Simone - Pastel Blues (1965)

Pastel Blues is a studio album by Jazz singer/pianist/songwriter Nina Simone (1933–2003). It was recorded in 1964 and 1965 in New York City and released in 1965 by Philips Records. The name Pastel Blues is somewhat deceiving because the songs on the album incorporate different musical styles besides the blues, such as jazz, soul and folk music.

If this is blues, it's blues in the Billie Holiday sense, not the Muddy Waters one. This is one of Nina Simone's more subdued mid-'60s LPs, putting the emphasis on her piano rather than band arrangements.

It's rather slanted toward torch-blues ballads like "Strange Fruit," "Trouble In Mind," Billie Holiday's own composition "Tell Me More and More and Then Some," and "Nobody Knows You When You're Down and Out."
Simone's then-husband, Andy Stroud, wrote "Be My Husband," an effective adaptation of a traditional blues chant.

By far the most impressive track is her frantic ten-minute rendition of the traditional "Sinnerman," an explosive tour de force that dwarfs everything else on the album.     

Tracklist:
A1Be My Husband
A2Nobody Knows You When You're Down And Out
A3End Of The Line
A4Trouble In Mind
A5Tell Me More And More And Then Some
A6Chilly Winds Don't Blow
B1Ain't No Use
B2Strange Fruit
B3Sinnerman

Nina Simone - Pastel Blues (1965)
(256 kbps, cover art included)         

Dienstag, 22. Juli 2014

Reneshoua

Jillem, thanks a lot for all your musical gifts, we miss you and your wonderful blog! Hope to see your blog again soon!

The Legendary Sir Lancelot - Calypso of the West Indies and Ballads of the Caribbean


Chances are that unless you're an old movie buff, you've never heard of Sir Lancelot. Beginning in 1940, however, and for the next 16 years until Harry Belafonte came along, he was the most popular calypso singer in the world and a singing star in the United States. Belafonte himself has described Sir Lancelot as a major influence on his own work and career, and as his inspiration.

Born Lancelot Victor Edward Pinard in Cumuto, North Trinidad, the son of a government official, he began singing at the age of six in a one-hour recital. By the time he was finished with high school, his voice had matured into a perfect tenor instrument, but music didn't seem to be available to him as a career choice - rather, his father sent him to New York to study medicine. By sheer chance, he was heard singing and invited to try a two-week engagement at the Village Vanguard, which turned into a year-long booking. In 1941, he went out west to play engagements at colleges in California and Oregon, and following a concert in Los Angeles, Sir Lancelot was contracted to make his first screen appearance, in the Pat O'Brien/Janet Blair vehicle Two Yanks in Trinidad. This appearance, in turn, led to his being booked on tours of Mexico, South America, and the Caribbean.

His first credited film appearance was in the atmospheric Val Lewton chiller "I Walked with a Zombie", where his songs provided ironic commentary on the action of the movie. He later played a dramatic role in Lewton's "The Ghost Ship" and "Curse of the Cat People"; "Eve Knew Her Apples", starring Ann Miller, "To Have and Have Not" with Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall, and "Brute Force" starring Burt Lancaster. He was well-known enough by then to play characters simply known as "Sir Lancelot" in pictures as different as the comedy "Linda Be Good" and "The Unknown Terror".

Sir Lancelot's singing appearances on radio and television, on shows hosted by Ray Anthony, Ed Sullivan, and Dinah Shore (where he sang the praises of sponsors Ford, Elgin watches, Coca-Cola, and Borden's Milk, and often got more fan mail than Shore herself) planted the seeds of the calypso boom that led the way to Belafonte's rise to fame at the end of the '50s. In 1955, he left the United States for an extended tour of Europe and the Middle East, but returned to Hollywood three years later to appear in "The Buccaneer", a big-budget widescreen historical drama starring Yul Brynner and directed by Anthony Quinn. He continued singing and recording, and made occasional television appearances as late as 1968, when he turned up in a non-singing role in an episode of The Andy Griffith Show, and continued to record at least through 1973.

The album "Calypso of the West Indies and Ballads of the Caribbean" is a Caribbean music treasure, 14 songs from Trinidad, Puerto Rico, Barbados, Haiti, Cuba, and Martinique, sung in Sir Lancelot's pleasing, rich tenor voice, in high spirits and boundless joy, backed by everything from a simple guitar to a steel band. Recorded between 1946 and 1973, in surprisingly good sound (only 1946's "Ugly Woman" - track 12 - sounds compressed, transferred off of a 78 rpm disc). The 1958 tracks (tracks 1 - 9, recorded in Hollywood) feature the Mac Niles Caribe Carnival Band, Steel Drummers, and Singers, and the repertory includes the originals "Jump in the Line" and "Tied-Tongue Mopsy," classics like "Run Joe," "Matilda," and "Jamaica Farewell". Amazingly, the 1973 vintage track, "Double Indemnity" (track 10 - as charming and delightful as the movie of that name is dark and depressing), shows Lancelot's voice in astonishingly good shape, and hardly different at all from its 1946 incarnation.

The Legendary Sir Lancelot - Calypso of the West Indies and Ballads of the Caribbean
(192 kbps, no cover art included)

Montag, 21. Juli 2014

Mighty Ryeders - Help Us Spread The Message

A funky treasure from the 70s - a record that hardly made waves at the time, but which has lived on strongly for years - thanks to a great sample history and key interest from generations of groove diggers! Coming on like a black hippie missionary cult (a belief bolstered by the cover photo of the band sitting atop several globes featuring each of the continents), the Ryeders' sole album is chock full of killer creative tracks mixing funk, soul and boogie-disco arrangements.

Image

Mighty Ryeders have a sound that's clearly influenced by Earth Wind & Fire - funk with a good dose of jazz, often done with some righteous undercurrents in the lyrics - but their groove is also a bit more rough-edged too, sharing some funky 45-levels of excitement, and showing a great ear for sharply jazzy changes! This last aspect has really helped the group's sound stay fresh over the years - and the album's a treasure trove of killer cuts - from the famous "Evil Vibrations" (sampled by De La Soul on "A Rollerskating Jam Named Saturday"), right on down through other gems like "The Mighty Ryeders", "Let There Be Peace", "Lovely", "Help Us Spread The Message", "Fly Away With Me", "Sar Children", and "I've Really Got The Feeling".

Mighty Ryeders - Help Us Spread The Message
(192 kbps, small cover included)

Sonntag, 20. Juli 2014

VA - Stimmen des 20. Jahrhunderts - 1933 - Der Weg in die Katastrophe

It happened 70 years ago: The attempt on Hitler’s life on 20 July 1944, was the seventeenth known occasion that someone had tried to kill the NS-dictator Adolf Hitler.
Unlike other attempts however this, the 20 July Bomb Plot, was the most intricate, and involved plans for a new Germany following the successful accomplishment of the mission.

"On this day in 1944, Hitler cheats death as a bomb planted in a briefcase goes off, but fails to kill him.

High German officials had made up their minds that Hitler must die. He was leading Germany in a suicidal war on two fronts, and assassination was the only way to stop him. A coup d'etat would follow, and a new government in Berlin would save Germany from complete destruction at the hands of the Allies. That was the plan. This was the reality: Colonel Claus von Stauffenberg, chief of the army reserve, had been given the task of planting a bomb during a conference that was to be held at Berchtesgaden, but was later moved to Hitler's "Wolf's Lair", a command post at Rastenburg, Prussia. Stauffenberg planted the explosive in a briefcase, which he placed under a table, then left quickly. Hitler was studying a map of the Eastern front as Colonel Heinz Brandt, trying to get a better look at the map, moved the briefcase out of place, farther away from where the Fuhrer was standing. At 12:42 p.m. the bomb went off. When the smoke cleared, Hitler was wounded, charred, and even suffered the temporary paralysis of one arm - but he was very much alive. (He was even well enough to keep an appointment with Benito Mussolini that very afternoon. He gave Il Duce a tour of the bomb site.) Four others present died from their wounds.

As the bomb went off, Stauffenberg was making his way to Berlin to carry out Operation Valkyrie, the overthrow of the central government. In Berlin, he and co-conspirator General Olbricht arrested the commander of the reserve army, General Fromm, and began issuing orders for the commandeering of various government buildings. And then the news came through from Herman Goering - Hitler was alive. Fromm, released from custody under the assumption he would nevertheless join the effort to throw Hitler out of office, turned on the conspirators. Stauffenberg and Olbricht were shot that same day. Once Hitler figured out the extent of the conspiracy (it reached all the way to occupied French), he began the systematic liquidation of his enemies. More than 7,000 Germans would be arrested (including evangelical pastor Dietrich Bonhoeffer), and up to 5,000 would wind up dead—either executed or as suicides. Hitler, Himmler, and Goering took an even firmer grip on Germany and its war machine. Hitler became convinced that fate had spared him—"I regard this as a confirmation of the task imposed upon me by Providence"—and that "nothing is going to happen to me... [T]he great cause which I serve will be brought through its present perils and...everything can be brought to a good end." - http://www.history.com

Remembering this event, we feature a co-production of the "Deutsches Historisches Museum Berlin" and the "Deutsches Rundfunkarchiv" with audio documents from the year 1933: The year Adolf Hitler became dictator of Nazi Germany which lead to the catastrophe of the Second World War and the Holocaust. The Holocaust was a deliberate and systematic extermination of European Jews during World War II. As the Allied Powers fought Nazi Germany's domination of Europe, Adolf Hitler's henchmen were carrying out a mass annihilation of the Jews in Europe at their numerous concentration camps. The total number of Jews murdered during this genocide has been estimated to be nearly 6 million. Besides European Jews, there were many other groups targeted for destruction. They included the handicapped, mentally ill, Gypsies, Jehovah's Witnesses, homosexuals and political dissidents.



Tracklist:

TracknummerAufnahmedatumTitelDauer
0115.01.1933Ansprache von Reichskanzler Kurt von Schleicher auf einer Kundgebung des Deutschen Reichskriegerbundes 3'17"
0230.01.1933Reportage vom Fackelzug der SA- und der Stahlhelmformationen vor der Berliner Reichskanzlei3'18"
0304.03.1933Amtseinführung des amerikanischen Präsideten Franklin D. Roosevelt 2'34"
0421.03.1933Reportage vom "Tag der Nation" in Potsdam 4'50"

23.03.1933Reichstagssitzung: Verabschiedung des "Ermächtigungsgesetzes"
05Reichstagspräsident Hermann Göring 1'51"
06Adolf Hitler: Regierungserklärung 3'16"
07Otto Wels (SPD-Fraktionsvorsitzender) 2'38"
08Adolf Hitler: Erwiderung auf die Rede von Otto Wels3'40"
0901.04.1933Aufruf zum Boykott jüdischer Geschäfte: Sprechchöre; Joesph Goebbels (Reichspropagandaminister)1'04"
1005.04.1933Reportage von einer Polizeiaktion im Berliner Scheunenviertel3'52"
1110.05.1933Reportage von der Bücherverbrennung auf dem Berliner Opernplatz 2'15"
121933Werbung für Kienzle-Uhren: "Deutsch ist die Uhr, deutsch ist der Klang"3'50"
1311.09.1933Kundgebung der Vaterländischen Front in Wien mit Bundeskanzler Engelbert Dollfuß 3'22"
1420.09.1933Rundfunkansprache von Ernst Röhm, Stabschef der SA1'06"
1530.09.1933Reportage aus dem Konzentrationslager Oranienburg (bei Berlin)4'10"
1630.09.1933Ansprache von Reichsjustizkommisar Hans Frank in Leipzig auf einer Tagung des Nationalsozialistischen Juristenbundes3'05"
1711.11 1933Aufruf von Reichspräsident Paul von Hindenburg zur Volksabstimmung am 12. November 19331'36"
1815.11.1933Ansprache von Reichspropagandaminster Joseph Goebbels anlässlich der Eröffnung der Reichskulturkammer in der Berliner Philharmonie 3'43"
1916.11.1933Kommentar von Radio Wien zur Volksabstimmung in Deutschland am 12. November 19331'42"
2019.11.1933Ansprache von Theodor Adrian von Renteln, Präsident des DIHT, auf einer Tagung des Reichsstandes des deutschen Handels in Braunschweig2'32"
2112.12.1933Reportage von der Eröffnung des Reichstages in der Berliner Krolloper1'58"
2216.12.1933Leipziger Reichstagsbrandprozess: Schlusswort des Angeklagten Georgi Dimitroff
(mit Einsprüchen von Senatspräsident Wilhelm Bünger)
5'21"
2320.12.1933Ansprache von Reichssendeleiter Eugen Hadamovsky anlässlich der Eröffnung der drei Großsender Berlin, München und Stuttgart2'12"
241933"Ein Reich ist uns entstanden". Ein Hörbild von Kurt Klawitter3'25"


VA - Stimmen des 20. Jahrhunderts - 1933 - Der Weg in die Katastrophe
(256 kbps, front cover included)

Mittwoch, 2. Juli 2014

Velvet Underground - A Young Person´s Guide To

PhotobucketA Young Person´s Guide To Velvet Underground" is a collection of various rare cuts, pre-Velvet-Underground tracks, studio demos and Max's live tracks. It comes with an 8-pages photo book and covers the early years of VU.

The included song "Waves" was the working title for "Ocean".
Tracks:
1. Inside Of Your Heart (2:26)
2. White Light/White Heat (2:48)
3. Rock'n Roll (5:21)
4. Waves (5:23)
5. I've Got A Tiger In My Tank (2:12)
6. You're Driving Me Insane (2:22)
7. Index (4:29)
8. VU Noise (1:49)
9. Sweet Jane (4:51)
10. I'm Set Free (5:12)
11. You Better Walk It, As You Talk It (1:59)
12. Lonesome Cowboy Bill (3:48)
13. Sneaky Pete (2:10)
14. I'm Waiting For My Man (4:34)

Sources:
1, 3, 4 : rough mix acetate demos / 2 : mono mix, 1967 / 5, 6, 13 : pre-VU tracks / 7 : Andy Warhol's Index book flexi / 8 : The East Village Other LP / 9 : Max's Kansas City, August 23, 1970 / 10, 12, 14 : Max's Kansas City, July 26, 1970 / 11 : Max's Kansas City, rehearsals, Summer 1970.


Velvet Underground - A Young Person´s Guide To
(192 kbps, front cover included)

Samstag, 28. Juni 2014

Woody Guthrie - The Legendary Woody Guthrie

Originally posted in July, 2012:

HAPPY 100th BIRTHDAY WOODY!

Woody Guthrie was born on July 14th, 1912 in Okemah, Oklahoma. So we can celebrate his 100th birthday next saturday. And we will post some of his wonderful songs during this week.

Woody Guthrie was the most important American folk music artist of the first half of the 20th century, in part because he turned out to be such a major influence on the popular music of the second half of the 20th century, a period when he himself was largely inactive. His greatest significance lies in his songwriting, beginning with the standard "This Land Is Your Land" and including such much-covered works as "Deportee," "Do Re Mi," "Grand Coulee Dam," "Hard, Ain't It Hard," "Hard Travelin'," "I Ain't Got No Home," "1913 Massacre," "Oklahoma Hills," "Pastures of Plenty," "Philadelphia Lawyer," "Pretty Boy Floyd," "Ramblin' Round," "So Long It's Been Good to Know Yuh," "Talking Dust Bowl," and "Vigilante Man." These and other songs have been performed and recorded by a wide range of artists, including a who's who of folksingers.
 
Most of those performances and recordings came after Guthrie's enforced retirement due to illness in the early '50s. During his heyday, in the 1940s, he was a major-label recording artist, a published author, and a nationally broadcast radio personality. But the impression this creates, that he was a multi-media star, is belied by his personality and his politics. Restlessly creative and prolific, he wrote, drew, sang, and played constantly, but his restlessness also expressed itself in a disinclination to stick consistently to any one endeavor, particularly if it involved a conventional, cooperative approach. Nor did he care to stay in any one place for long. This idiosyncratic individualism was complemented by his rigorously left-wing political views. During his life, much attention was given in the U.S. to whether people of a liberal bent were or had ever been members of the Communist party. No reliable evidence has emerged that Guthrie was, but there is little doubt where his sympathies lay; for many years, he wrote a column published in Communist newspapers.

Ironically, as Guthrie's health declined to the point of permanent hospitalization in the '50s, his career took off through his songs and his example, which served as inspiration for the folk revival in general and, in the early '60s, Bob Dylan in particular. By the mid-'60s, Guthrie's songs were appearing on dozens of records, his own recordings were being reissued and, in some cases, released for the first time, and his prolific writings were being edited into books. This career resurgence was in no way slowed by his death in 1967; on the contrary, it continued for decades afterward, as new books were published and the Guthrie estate invited such artists as Billy Bragg and Wilco in to write music for Guthrie's large collection of unpublished lyrics, creating new songs to record.


Tracks:

1. What Did The Deep Sea Say - Guthrie, Woody & Cisco Houston
2. Oregon Trial
3. Car Song
4. We Shall Be Free - Guthrie, Woody & Leadbelly/Sonny Terry/Cisco Houston
5. Danville Girl
6. Struggle Blues
7. John Henry - Guthrie, Woody & Cisco Houston
8. Chisholm Trail - Guthrie, Woody & Cisco Houston
9. Ludlowe Massacre
10.: Nine Hundred Miles
11. Make Me A Pallet On Your Floor
12. Buffalo Skinner's
13. Ramblin' Round
14. Rising Sun Blues (house of the rising sun)
15. Lindbergh
16. Vigilante Man
17. Two Good Men
18. Red River Valley - Guthrie, Woody & Cisco Houston
19. Ranger's Command
20. Farmer Labour Train
21. Sinking Of The Rueben James
22. Hard Ain't It Hard
.

Samstag, 21. Juni 2014

The Best Of Chess Rock´n´Roll (1989)

"The Best of Chess Rock & Roll" gives a good portrait of the seminal record label's massive contributions to rock & roll.

Not only are landmarks like Chuck Berry's "Johnny B. Goode" and Bo Diddley's "Bo Diddley" covered, but cult favorites like the Moonglows and the Students are also featured. With "Johnny B. Goode," "Maybelline," "Who Do You Love," "Ain't Got No Home," "Rocket 88," and "Susie Q", it is one of the most essential single-disc rock collections ever assembled.
.
The Best Of Chess Rock´n´Roll (1989)

(192 kbps, full cover art included)

Montag, 16. Juni 2014

Chicago - The Blues - Today! Vol. 2

 


Otis Rush, Jimmy Cotton, and Homesick James Williamson are all from Mississippi, and each of them has found a place for himself in Chicago through his music, if you’re good, with a style of your own, there’s a Chicago blues business waiting to pick you up. Otis Rush is one of the best of the young Chicago bluesmen. He works steadily, seven nights a week at a lounge on the West Side. At the club, Curley’s, there isn’t much of a crowd on week nights; so he lets somebody from the neighborhood work the first set and he sits at a side table with two or three friends. It’s dark in the club and the band works on a high bandstand under dim red fluorescent lights. The crowd at Curley’s is younger, and they’ve been away from the blues for a while; so Otis can reach out into the area where the blues and jazz intermingle. “I was born in Philadelphia, Mississippi, but I left when I was fifteen...” He plays left-handed, looking down at his fingers on a solo. “It was the winter when I first came up and it was cold, but I had a sister living here; so I stayed with her.” He’s only 31 and he looks younger. “As a kid I just liked the looks of the guitar, but I didn’t play. I started after I got up here and got a little older and heard Muddy and Buddy Guy and T-Bone Walker...” Otis has always been an exciting singer, and he has matured into a brilliant, inventive guitar player. The rest of the band is even younger, and they move from the blues of Otis’ “I Can’t Quit You Baby” to the hard edged blues-jazz of “Rock” with an easy familiarity—except for the alto man, “Sax” Crowder, a thin, quiet musician from the 1939 Earl Hines Band. His jazz has always been the blues, and his blues style has always been jazz. This is the new, young, “tough,” Chicago blues—”tough” the South Side term for the newest, the most exciting.

With Jimmy Cotton the sound is closer to the country style. He’s been Muddy Waters harp man since 1957, and Muddy doesn’t stray far from the first band sound he developed in the mid-1940’s. At Pepper’s Lounge, where the band usually works when it’s in town, you can get down close to the bandstand and hear Jimmy sing. Muddy usually sits at one of the tables and lets Jimmy or Otis Spann do most of the playing. The Chicago harmonica—”harp”—style is one of the distinctive sounds of the Chicago blues, the instrument played differently than it was in the South. Jimmy, like Junior Wells and Little Walter Jacobs and Big Walter Horton, holds it against a cheap amplifier mike, cupping both the microphone and the harp in his hands. He’s in his early 30’s, and despite ten or so years away from the South there’s still some of the easy country enthusiasm in his exuberant singing—and even some of the country concerns in his blues about the outskirts of Helena, Arkansas, about bad cotton crops, and about new cars and ungrateful women.
Homesick James has been up from Mississippi longer, since 1947, but he has as much of the down home sound as Jimmy. His style comes partly from his cousin, Elmore James—Homesick worked with him on and off before Elmore’s death in the mid 1950’s—and partly from his own country background. The sound is as distinctive to Chicago as Jimmy’s harp. It’s the electrified “slide” style that Muddy and Elmore developed out of the Mississippi “bottleneck” playing. You put a metal bearing ring or a piece of metal pipe on the little finger of your left hand and you can work the strings to get almost any kind of sound. Homesick works at most of the South Side clubs, but he’s had a steady factory job ever since he got to Chicago; so he usually plays only on Friday and Saturday in one of the small clubs. The sound of the blues has changed on the South Side, but there’s still some of the sound of Mississippi music around the corner in a neighborhood bar, or in a lounge near the El tracks—the loneliness and the insecurity of the country music intensified, driven into a new creative excitement, in the slums of the northern city.

Chicago - The Blues - Today! Vol. 2
(192 kbps, ca. 62 MB)




Notes from the original release of "Chicago/The Blues/Today Vol. 2":

“Sweet Home Chicago”...up from Meridian, Mississippi, up from Tuscaloosa, Alabama, from Jackson, from Selma, Memphis, Helena, Brownsville, Bessemer, Natchez...to a rooming house on S. Indiana, to a run down hotel on West Roosevelt, to a folding bed in a sister’s apartment on S. Lake Park. If you’re colored it’s better in Chicago than it is in Mississippi—unless you’re aggressive or talented or lucky not much better, but enough so that you get on the Greyhound bus in Jackson or Tupelo with some food in a shoe box and your clothes in a paper suitcase, or you sit up for a gritty night in a railroad coach, or you get a ride with somebody who’s got a battered car. Jobs? There aren’t many, and what there are don’t offer much more than you could have gotten back in the South. Someplace to stay? The rooms are small and dirty and you live poor and cramped until you can get a steady job and move into something better.

Sometimes—if you’ve come up from a cotton farm, or from a slow back country town—everything seems changed. the buildings along Indiana or Prairie in the south ‘30s, or on the streets going east to the lake, have a heavy, imposing look—stone and brick, with names carved into the top stone arch, “Doris,” “Paloma,” “Linda,” “Windermere,” but the stones are black with soot and the names are grimy and weathered. In the entrance hallways a broken light bulb dangles from the ceiling, and the names are scrawled on the walls beside the battered mail boxes. Beside most of the names a note like, “Third floor rear ring 2 times.” There isn’t enough money to rent a whole apartment; so a five room apartment becomes four rooms for four families with a kitchen for everybody to share. Along the inside hallways the doors have been wearily dragged shut with wires and hooks and cheap padlocks, but on most of them are old scratches and broken hasps, the marks of thieves who hang around in the dark hallways and back entrances of the buildings. But some things haven’t changed as much. Climbing up the stairs to somebody’s apartment you can hear the voices from the rooms around you. Children crying, women calling to each other, somebody singing, an abrupt argument... and you can hear music. Somebody’s always playing a radio or a phonograph and most of the time the music has the raw, insistent sound of the Chicago blues.

The blues is still the same emotional expression that it is in Mississippi, but in Chicago, like a lot of other things, the blues has changed. It isn’t only that the sound is different, that the clubs have to have three or four piece bands instead of one or two men with guitars, that the instruments have all been electrified to be heard over the noise of the crowded barrooms where the men work. The old style was less determined, less relentless, it was concerned with country towns and country roads and country cabins. It was “country” blues. If you grew up out along one of the rivers of the delta, or back on a one lane dirt road, there was a least the sun and the afternoon wind and the streams to fish in and the fall mornings when you could hunt in overgrown fields; so the music was gentler, sometimes almost warm and easy in its worries with love and loneliness. But there isn’t much sun in the South Side streets, and the apartment houses are overcrowded, and the winters are bitter and the spring comes late; so the music is harder, with some of the city’s mean ferocity.

Samstag, 24. Mai 2014

Franz Josef Degenhardt - Junge Paare auf Bänken - Franz Josef Degenhardt singt Georges Brassens (1986)


The songs on Degenhardt's 1986 album "Junge Paare Auf Den Bänken" ("Young Couples on the Benches") are his translations into German of chansons by the French singer-songwriter Georges Brassens, spiritually perhaps one of Degenhardts closest musical allies.

Georges Brassens ( 22 October 1921 – 29 October 1981), was a French singer-songwriter and poet.
Brassens was born in Sète, a town in southern France near Montpellier.
Now an iconic figure in France, he achieved fame through his elegant songs with their harmonically complex music for voice and guitar and articulate, diverse lyrics; indeed, he is considered one of France's most accomplished postwar poets.
He has also set to music poems by both well-known and relatively obscure poets, including Louis Aragon (Il n'y a pas d'amour heureux), Victor Hugo (La Légende de la Nonne, Gastibelza), Jean Richepin, François Villon (La Ballade des Dames du Temps Jadis), and Guillaume Apollinaire, Antoine Pol (Les Passantes).

During World War II, he was forced by the Germans to work in a labor camp at a BMW aircraft engine plant in Basdorf near Berlin in Germany (March 1943). Here Brassens met some of his future friends, such as Pierre Onténiente, whom he called Gibraltar because he was "steady as a rock." They would later become close friends.
After being given ten days' leave in France, he decided not to return to the labour camp. Brassens took refuge in a slum called "Impasse Florimont," in the 14th arrondissement of Paris, where he lived for several years with Jeanne Planche, a friend of his aunt. Planche lived with her husband Marcel in relative poverty: without gas, running water, or electricity. Brassens remained hidden there until the end of the war five months later, but ended up staying for 22 years.

This album was recorded january 1986 in 'Musikstudio M 1, Studio Hamburg', Germany, with
Franz Josef Degenhardt (translation of the George Brassens lyrics, lyrics track 10, vocals,guitar), Lech Wieleba (bass), Jan Reimer (guitar), Steve Baker (harp), produced by Jimmy Bowien, engineered by Gert Hauke.

Tracklisting:

1. Junge Paare auf Bänken (Les amoureux des bancs publics)
2. Marinette
3. Ich mach mich ganz klein (Je me suis fait tout petit)
4. Mit einer Hacke auf der Schulter (Pauvre Martin)
5. Das Testament (Le Testament)
6. Margot (Brave Margot)
7. Vorsicht Gorilla (Le Gorille)
8. König Großkotz (Le Roi)
9. Weltkrieg Nr. 1 (La guerre de 14 - 18)
10. Au pere eternel (für George Brassens)

Franz Josef Degenhardt - Paar auf Bänken  
(192 kbps, front cover included)

Mittwoch, 14. Mai 2014

Greetings!

We will be back in some days.

Greetings!

Montag, 31. März 2014

T-Bone Walker - I Get So Weary (1961)

Modern electric blues guitar can be traced directly back to this Texas-born pioneer, who began amplifying his sumptuous lead lines for public consumption circa 1940 and thus initiated a revolution so total that its tremors are still being felt today.

Few major postwar blues guitarists come to mind that don't owe T-Bone Walker an unpayable debt of gratitude. B.B. King has long cited him as a primary influence, marveling at Walker's penchant for holding the body of his guitar outward while he played it. Gatemouth Brown, Pee Wee Crayton, Goree Carter, Pete Mayes, and a wealth of other prominent Texas-bred axemen came stylistically right out of Walker during the late '40s and early '50s. Walker's nephew, guitarist R.S. Rankin, went so far as to bill himself as T-Bone Walker, Jr. for a 1962 single on Dot, "Midnight Bells Are Ringing" (with his uncle's complete blessing, of course; the two had worked up a father-and-son-type act long before that).

"I Get So Weary" is one more LP of Walker's elegant guitar and smooth vocals.    


Tracklist:
A1 Here In The Dark
A2 I Miss You Baby
A3 Life Is Too Short
A4 I Get So Weary
A5 You Just Wanted To Use Me
A6 When The Sun Goes Down
A7 Everytime Pony Tail
B1 Thorough With Women
B2 Street Walking Woman
B3 Party Girl
B4 High Society
B5 Lollie You
B6 Got No Use For You
B7 Wanderin' Heart


T-Bone Walker - I Get So Weary (1961)
(192 kbps, front cover included)           

Donnerstag, 27. März 2014

Ofra Haza - Yemenite Songs (1984)

This was the break-through album for World Music and for Ofra Haza: when the Diva met the Diwan and the beat box bumped into 400-year-old Yemenite songs. Songs of joy, yearning and devotion all delivered with that voice of pure gold, taken away from us by her tragic early death.

Ofra Haza's death on February 23, 2000, at the age of 41 deprived the world of a lovely woman, a great vocalist, and a fearless cultural advocate. Her 1984 album of boldly reimagined traditional Yemenite songs, brought her international fame, and decades later, it retains its ability to delight and inspire. The set list consists of secular tunes plus examples of a festive devotional style called diwan, which is common to all Oriental Jewish communities and can be sung in Hebrew, Aramaic, or Arabic. Each group has specific traditions, but the Yemeni variant is especially remarkable for its poetry, much of which was written by rabbis as far back as the 17th century. Most diwan consist of three separate sections: the a cappella nashid (prelude), the shira (singing), during which celebrants bang on copper trays, empty gasoline cans, or whatever else is handy, and a postlude called the hallel, or song of praise. The unusual percussion accompaniment came into use following the destruction of the Temple, when Jews were forbidden to play conventional musical instruments, and also as a result of periodic oppression by Muslim fundamentalists.

In Haza's hands, these sinuous tunes are further spiced up by drum machines and synthesizers, pumping out the hypnotic dance beats that catapulted the album onto dancefloors throughout the world. It is important to remember that this recording long predated the flood of world/techno fusions that have since overwhelmed the marketplace. Transglobal Underground, Afro-Celt Sound System, and Scandinavian groups like Garmarna all owe Haza a debt of gratitude. But despite the historic electronic flourishes, it is the siren-like charm of the singer's voice that creates the most indelible impression.             

Tracklist:

Im Nin' Alu 5:16
Yachilvi Veyachali 3:24
A'Salk 4:42
Medley: 5:44
Tzur Menati
Se'i Yona
Sapri Tama
-
Galbi 4:14
Ode Le'Eli 3:29
Lefelach Harimon 5:06
Ayelet Chen 6:29

Ofra Haza - Yemenite Songs (1984)
(256 kbps, cover art included)  

Dienstag, 25. März 2014

The SWAPO Singers – One Namibia One Nation (SWAPO Freedom Songs)


Like South Africa’s ANC, Namibia’s liberation organisation SWAPO has from time to time put together agit-prop bands or choirs, to bolster the morale of the troops or attract overseas media attention.
One generation of the SWAPO Singers came to Western attention in the mid-80s, when Jerry Dammers and Robert Wyatt respectively produced and collaborated on "Wind Of Change", which also featured Onyeka.   

DIAL AFRICA wrote about this album:
"The 1980s were the time, when the countries of southern Africa were fighting for freedom. In Namibia SWAPO organised not only this struggle but also a lot of support in Europe. One document was this LP here which led to a very pop(ular) version of a song called "Wind of Change"."

Tracklist:
A1 Afrika (Africa)
Vocals [Sung By] – Jackson Kaujewa
3:10
A2 Odi Wena Vorster (Warning Vorster Get Out Of Namibia)
Vocals [Sung By] – Dan-Hafeni Haipinge, Jackson Kaujewa
1:30
A3 Va Nambia Va Kwetu (Fellow Namibians)
Vocals [Sung By] – Albertina Heita, Dan-Hafeni Haipinge, Freida Kaurimuje, Jackson Kaujewa, Martha Elieser, Nick Nambahu, Sackey Schikwambi
1:55
A4 The Wind Of Change
Vocals [Sung By] – Jackson Kaujewa
2:30
A5 Shilongno Shetu (My Country)
Vocals [Sung By] – Jackson Kaujewa
3:40
A6 Twanana Swapo Yeti (We Are United In Swapo)
Vocals [Sung By] – Albertina Heita, Dan-Hafeni Haipinge, Freida Kaurimuje, Jackson Kaujewa, Martha Elieser, Nick Nambahu, Sackey Schikwambi
2:05
B1 Mwene Kala Pamwe Na Afrika (God Bless Africa)
Vocals [Sung By] – Albertina Heita, Dan-Hafeni Haipinge, Jackson Kaujewa, Martha Elieser
2:10
B2 Ti Mamasa Ta Gegaisera Mo=gao (I Want To See My Mother)
Vocals [Sung By] – Jackson Kaujewa
2:30
B3 Tunana Ko Ngutukiro (Lead Us To Freedom)
Vocals [Sung By] – Albertina Heita, Dan-Hafeni Haipinge, Freida Kaurimuje, Jackson Kaujewa, Martha Elieser, Nick Nambahu, Sackey Schikwambi
2:00
B4 We Are The Soldiers Of Swapo
Vocals [Sung By] – Albertina Heita, Martha Elieser
1:55
B5 Give Me Back Namibia
Vocals [Sung By] – Jackson Kaujewa
2:45
B6 Power To The People
Vocals [Sung By] – Dan-Hafeni Haipinge, Jackson Kaujewa
3:10
B7 Afrika (Africa)
Vocals [Sung By] – Jackson Kaujewa
3:10

The SWAPO Singers - One Namibia One Nation (SWAPO Freedom Songs)
(320 kbps, cover art included)

Dienstag, 25. Februar 2014

Sun Ra - Supersonic Jazz (1956)

Sun Ra had only been heading his Arkestra for a couple of years when they recorded the 12 songs featured on this 1956 session. But while the arrangements, ensemble work, and solos are not as ambitious, expansive, or free-wheeling as they became on later outings, the groundwork was laid on such cuts as "India," "Sunology," and one of the first versions of "Blues at Midnight." Ra's band already had the essential swinging quality and first-class soloists, and he had gradually challenged them with compositions that did not rely on conventional hard bop riffs, chord changes, and structure but demanded a personalized approach and understanding of sound and rhythm far beyond standard thinking. You can hear in Ra's solos and those of John Gilmore, Pat Patrick, Charles Davis, and others an emerging freedom and looseness which would explode in the future.        

"This 1956 album was out of this world! Sun Ra, a super talented pianist/composer played a big role in the Avant-Garde movement and was right there with Mingus, thinking “outside of the box” and taking risky improvised chances. The Jazz Con Class Radio listeners who never heard of Sun Ra will enjoy this mostly Hard Bop album very much but should learn more of his Avant-Garde albums that later followed. The ones who are very familiar with Sun Ra would be totally surprise to hear such a “down to earth” album from this “out of space” innovator. “Super-Sonic Jazz” is a collector’s item and every Jazz lover should have it in their collection along with all his other works. In my next to last post, I mentioned John Gilmore, who gave Coltrane saxophone lessons, is brilliant in this album. But then again, the whole band is great. Sun Ra’s belief that he was in contact with aliens from Saturn should not throw anyone off at all (Read biography below). This album will be featured for a week or so, check the schedule link for play times." - Jazz Con Class Radio

Tracklist:

A1 India
A2 Sunology
A3 Advice To Medics
A4 Super Blonde
A5 Soft Talk
B1 Kingdom Of Not
B2 Portrait Of The Living Sky
B3 Blues At Midnight
B4 El Is A Sound Of Joy
B5 Springtime In Chicago
B6 Medicine For A Nightmare

Sun Ra - Supersonic Jazz (1956)
(256 kbps, cover art included)

Donnerstag, 13. Februar 2014

Sun Ra And His Arkestra - Jazz In Silhouette (1959)

Throughout their mid-to-late-'50s stay in Chicago, Sun Ra (piano) and his Arkestra established themselves as formidable purveyors of a new strain or sub-genre of jazz. Having evolved from elaborate reworkings of familiar standards, "Jazz in Silhouette" (1959) presents a collection of originals, building upon Ra's abilities as a consummate multi-tasker - writing, arranging, scoring parts for his band, in addition to performing.

He stretches the boundaries of the music to suit the Arkestra, simultaneously progressing his distinct sound. Seminal readings of the quick and complex "Saturn" and "Velvet" are offered with unmatchable dexterity and precision. The latter title comes off like a confused version of "Jeepers Creepers" as Hobart Dotson (trumpet) prominently displays his unquestionable tonality. "Ancient Aiethopia" is one of the more involved works, both in terms of length - running over nine minutes - and the Arkestra's capacity for Ra's compositions. "Blues at Midnight" is another expansive (nearly 12 minutes) outing that, by contrast, is for the soloists rather than full ensemble. John Gilmore (tenor sax), Ronnie Boykins (bass), Pat Patrick (baritone sax), and Marshall Allen (alto sax) all shine behind William Cochran's (drums) solid contributions.

Equally significant is the running dialogue Ra maintains during other musicians' leads, directing the ebb and flow with an uncanny fusion of melody and rhythm. Undoubtedly, this is a factor in the freshness the material retains. It is also a prime example of Ra and company in a transitional phase, prior to their full-fledged explorations into the avant-garde.   


  

Recorded in 1959 at El Saturn Studio, Chicago, the album is one of three records that the Arkestra released in the 1950s - the other two being Jazz by Sun Ra and Super-Sonic Jazz. Originally released in a simple silk-screened cover credited to HP Corbissero, the album had gained its sci-fi cover, 'of half-naked women teleporting themselves over one of the moons of Saturn', credited to 'Evans'  by the early 1960s. The album was reissued by Impulse in 1974, and released on CD by Evidence in 1992.

When originally released, the album's sides were reversed, starting with Hours After at the beginning of side one, and ending side two with Ancient Aiethopia. Enlightenment in particular was to become a staple of the Arkestra's concerts, often featuring chanted lyrics. 

Tracklist:

Enlightenment
Saturn
Velvet
Ancient Aiethopia
Hours After
Horoscope
Images
Blues at Midnight

Sun Ra And His Arkestra - Jazz In Silhouette (1959)
(256 kbps, cover art included)