Dienstag, 25. Juli 2017

Dakar Sound Volume 2 - Sorano Singers

It was in the 70s that Dakar-businessman Mass Diokhane, dealer in cars and radio-cassete players, got the idea to produce young talents of his nieghbourhood on a label called "Touba Auto K7". So he hired a technician and they started to record the new sound of booming Dakar.

After the huge success of Etoile 2000 Diokhane´s next idea was to record the Sorano Singers, who are the vocalists of the national ensemble. They practice and perform at the Sorano theatre in Dakar, which is still the breeding-place for new traditional talent. Diokhane taped the music almost without rehearsing, using just two microphones, as the various singers improvise their text on a well known tradtional melody.

The Sorano singers are presented here with a selection of songs from their individual cassettes, all released in the beginning of the eighties. Madiodio makes her entranceon this CD with a song called Xouda Doki. She is accompagnied by a mysterious group called SK7. The orther artists are backed up by non other than Super Etoile.

VA - Dakar Sound Sampler Vol. 2

In Senegal, international capitalism meets traditional African commerce head on. The skyscrapers and colonial buildings of Dakar may be crumbling, but down by the Medina, the city´s original `native quarter´, they´re building vast ultra-modern banks, while, outside, stalls errupt from pavements heaving with hawkers and touts. And evreyone it seems, from the ragged beggars to the sleek-suited executives or the turbanned women in billowing robes and stiletto hells, is radiating pise and self possession - the same nonchalant swagger that underpins mbalax, the rhythm that has come to define Senegalese music.

A collection of classic West African pop music, "Dakar Sound Sampler Vol. 2" showcases some of the "Dakar Sound" label’s finest releases.

Tracklist:

 1. Bolero - Dexter Johnson
2. Mamu Wa Mpoy - African Fiesta
3. Seul - Superstar
4. Am Am - Royal Band
5. Kontar
6. Xouda Doki
7. Kolankoma - Sékou Bembya Diabaté
8. Darou Muxti
9. Tounka - Djanka Diabate,
10. Tama - Sekou Kouyate
11. Mkuki Myoni - Tondo
12. Kyere Wo Do
13. Dowaka
14. Liverpool

VA - Dakar Sound Sampler Vol. 2
(192 kbps, cover art included)

Montag, 24. Juli 2017

Art Bears - Winter Songs

Finding distribution on the Residents' Ralph Records label, the Art Bears' second album consists of 12 songs of various tensions: rest vs. speed, improv vs. pulse, space vs. density, Dagmar Kraus's vocals vs. everyone else.

As usual, Chris Cutler's lyrics tell political allegories through medieval-tinged stories: slaves, castles, and wheels of fortune (and industry) dominate. Fred Frith explores discordance through his guitar, and European folk figures through his always enjoyable violin.

Though not as confrontational as their other work, the centerpiece has to be the frantic "Rats and Monkeys" with three minutes of teeth-gritting, out-of-control insanity as all three players are plugged into a wall outlet and let rip. A guaranteed lease breaker if played often enough.


Tracklist:
A1The Bath Of Stars
A2First Things First
A3Gold
A4The Summer Wheel
A5The Slave
A6The Hermit
A7Rats And Monkeys
B1The Skeleton
B2The Winter Wheel
B3Man And Boy
B4Winter / War
B5Force
B63 Figures
B73 Wheels

Art Bears - Winter Songs
(320 kbps, cover art included)

Freitag, 21. Juli 2017

Ras Michael - Rastafari Dub (1972)

As the formerly cassette-only ROIR label continues to slowly reissue its catalog of classic punk, reggae and ska titles on CD, hidden treasures are coming to light again, some for the first time in years.

Ras Michael, one of the foremost exponents of traditional Nyahbinghi drumming and chanting, recorded his "Rastafari" album in 1972, and a dub version of that album was released simultaneously in a limited edition. Scraps of it have turned up from time to time, some on legitimate releases and some not, but ROIR's cassette reissue in 1989 was the first complete and fully licensed release since the original vinyl first came out.

It's too bad the non-dub version isn't included as well (there's plenty of space on the disc), but this CD is still a treasure. Ras Michael and his crew of drummers are joined by reggae demigods Carlton "Santa" Davis (drum set), Robbie Shakespeare (bass), Tommy McCook (flute), Earl "Chinna" Smith (guitar), and others, and the fusion of electric, urban reggae and organic, rural Nyahbinghi drumming is perfect. Particular highlights include the dub versions of "None a Jah Jah Children No Cry" (recommended especially in conjunction with its vocal version) and the very dry and heavy "In Zion."

Tracklist:

A1None A Jah Jah Children No Cry
A2Truth And Right
A3In Zion
A4Sufferation
B1Give Love
B2New Name
B3Birds In The Tree Top
B4No Hoppers


Ras Michael - Rastafari Dub (1972)
(256 kbps, cover art included)            

Donnerstag, 20. Juli 2017

VA - Cajun Vol. 1 - Abbeville Breakdown 1929-1939

A collection of ancient recordings of Cajun music by musicians from the Abbeville area of Louisiana. These songs were all recorded between 1929 and 1939, and are split essentially into two groups. The Breaux Fréres (and brother-in-law Joseph Falcon) provide the earlier half of the works, with an early mastery of the basic Cajun lineup that would become standard -- accordion, fiddle, and guitar. Falcon proves himself a worthy accordionist, paving the way for much of the later music to come from the genre (and simultaneously standing as the first recorded Cajun accordion player). Cleoma Breaux Falcon (his wife) is an able guitarist, and the Breaux Fréres do well on fiddle and accordion, as needed.

The second half of the album is dominated by the Alley Boys of Abbeville, an accordion-less group of youngsters who recorded once for Vocalion and were recorded again on various compilations. The recording quality on the album is admittedly sub-par, and seemingly not remastered completely. Nonetheless, it's an enjoyable album for those looking for the roots of Cajun music, though the rare recordings of Amédé Ardoin would be recommended beforehand, as the branching point for both Cajun and Zydeco forms.    

Tracklist:

 1. Vas Y Carrément  - Amedee Breaux/Cleoma Breaux & Ophy Breaux
2. Poche-Town - Joe Falcon/Cleoma Breaux & Ophy Breaux
3. Prenez Courage (Take Courage) - Cleoma Breaux/Joe Falcon & Ophy Breaux
4. Quand Je Suit Partis Pour Le Texas - Cleoma Breaux/Joe Falcon & Ophy Breaux
5. Aimer Et Perdre (To Love And Lose) - Joe Falcon
6. Egan One Step - Breaux Feres
7. T' As Volé Mon Chapeau (You Have Stolen My Hat) - Breaux Feres
8. Home Sweet Home - Breaux Feres
9. Le One Step A Martin - Breaux Feres
10. La Valse Du Bayou Plaquemine - Breaux Feres
11. Abbeville Breakdown
12. Te A Pas Raison (You Have No Reason)
13. Se Toute Sain Comme Moi Ma Saine (I Wonder If You Feel The Way I Do)
14. Jolie Petite Fille (Pretty Little Girl)
15. Quel Espoire (What's The Use)
16. Moi Et Ma Belle (Me And My Pretty One)
17. Je Vous T' Aime Lessair Pleurer (I'll Never Let You Cry)
18. Es Ce Que Tu Pense Jamais A Moi (Do You Ever Think Of Me)
19. Tu Ma Quite Seul (Prisoner's Song)
20. Jolie Petite Blonde (Small Pretty Blonde)
21. Apres Jengles A Toi (Thinking Of You)
22. Te Bonne Pour Moi Estere (I Don't Care What You Used To Be)


VA - Cajun Vol. 1 - Abbeville Breakdown 1929-1939    
(192 kbps, cover art included)    

Mittwoch, 19. Juli 2017

Brave Old World - Dus gezang fin geto Lodzh / Song of the Lodz Ghetto

Klezmer music traces back to the dance music played by itinerant Jewish music that traveled throughout Europe in the nineteenth century. The tradition is brought up to contemporary standards by Brave Old World, a group that includes members from California, Chicago, New York and Berlin. "The Washington Post' called Brave Old World "the revival's first supergroup. Every player is a virtuoso". "The Boston Globe" explained that Brave Old World "plays a klezmer music that is entirely grounded in the present, so intensely evolved from the music as it was, and, yet, so clearly, obviously, entirely klezmer that one could not seperate out many of the influences".

The original lineup of Brave Old World featured Joel Rubin on clarinet, Ben Bazyler on drums, Stu Brotman, a former member of 1960s' rock band, Kaleidescope and an ex-sideman for Canned Heat, Geoff and Maria Muldaur and Ry Cooder, on bass, cymablom, tilinka and percussion, Indiana-born and Berlin-based Alan Bern on keyboards and Michael Alpert, a founding member of Kapelye and a research associate at the YIVO Institute for Jewish research, on violin, accordion and vocals. Rubin was later replaced by Kurt Bjorling, musical director of the Chicago Klezmer Ensemble since 1984. In 1992, the group won first prize at the International Klezmer Festival in Sofed, Israel. In addition to their recordings, Brave Old World has been featured on two albums with violinist Itzhak Perlman.

This album was recorded live in Bordeaux. Song of the Lodz Ghetto is a unique musical work, a song cycle in which memory and imagination freely interact to create a Proustian journey between present and past. At the center are Brave Old World's arrangements of the rare Jewish street and cabaret songs from the Nazi ghetto of Lodz, Poland, 1940-44. Leading through the Lodz repertoire like stepping-stones through the river of memory are Brave Old World's own original compositions, reflections on 17 years of performing Jewish music. Michael Alpert's moving Berlin 1990 forms the emotional and musical counterpoint to the passionate and ironic street songs of the bard of the Lodz ghetto, Yankele Herszkowicz. A musical and spiritual journey of resistance, love, and reconciliation.

Tracklist:


1Rumkovski Khayim/Lodzh-Fidl2:43
2Lodzh-Overtur4:02
3A Gants Fayn Mazltov4:35
4Nisht Nor Simkhe/Veynendiks4:57
5Vayl Ikh Bin A Yidele3:28
6S'iz Kaydankes, Kaytn4:08
7Kimts In Herts /Rumkovski Khayim4:03
8Yikhes/Vinter 19425:58
9Makh Tsi Di Eygelekh3:11
10Berlin 19901:19
11Es Geyt A Yeke4:03
12Ver Klapt Du Azoy?/Geto Varyant4:24
13Geto, Getunya4:06
14Kuyavyak2:22
15Amerike Hot Erklert/Kemfn!4:20
16Berlin 19902:28
17Lodzh-Coda2:25
18Bobover Khupe-Marsh/Rumkovski Khayim6:56

Brave Old World - Dus gezang fin geto Lodzh / Song of the Lodz Ghetto
(192 kbps, cover art included)

Dienstag, 18. Juli 2017

Hugh Masekela - Still Grazing

Released to coincide with Hugh Masekela's autobiography of the same name, "Still Grazing" picks up the Masekela story from Verve's summary of the best of the MGM albums, "The Lasting Impression of Ooga-Booga", and runs through the "Uni" and "Blue Thumb" material. The 1966 tracks are from "The Emancipation of Hugh Masekela", where the trumpeter mixes his florid horn calls and vocals with variations of the boogaloo, township jive, soul-jazz, and in Antonio Carlos Jobim's "Felicidade," a slight pinch of bossa nova into a hip, brightly colored cuisine that no one else was attempting at the time.

As in the MGM days, Masekela is obliged to cover the hit tunes of the day, although "Up, Up, and Away" has more life and jazz licks than those earlier attempts. 1968's "The Promise of a Future" was the real commercial breakthrough - thanks to the out-of-the-blue success of the cowbell-beating "Grazing in the Grass," which improbably rose to the number one slot on Top 40 radio in those enlightened times. That triumphant track would be Masekela's last trip to the Top 40, whereupon he promptly used the exposure to shine a harsh light on what was going on in his homeland ("Gold") and America in 1968 ("Mace and Grenades"). The CD then jumps to a percolating, Echoplexed "Languta" from a 1973 session in Lagos, Nigeria, before concluding with a withering account of the South African coal-mining trains ("Stimela").

The package is given extra credibility by the original producer of these tracks, Stewart Levine, who compiled the album and also wrote a fond set of reminiscences. Many of these premonitions of today's world music scene have been gone for decades, and it's good to have at least some of them back in circulation again.  


Tracklist:

1Child Of The Earth
Bass – John CartwrightCongas – Big Black (2)Drums – Chuck CarterPiano – Charlie SmallsProducer – Stewart LevineTrumpet, Vocals – Hugh MasekelaWritten-By – Hugh Masekela
4:42
2Ha Lese Le Di Khanna
Bass – John CartwrightCongas – Big Black (2)Drums – Chuck CarterPiano – Charlie SmallsProducer – Stewart LevineTrumpet, Vocals – Hugh MasekelaWritten-By – Caiphus Semenya
6:45
3Felicidade
Bass – John CartwrightCongas – Big Black (2)Drums – Chuck CarterPiano – Charlie SmallsProducer – Stewart LevineTrumpet – Hugh MasekelaWritten-By – Antonio Carlos Jobim, Vinicius De Moraes
10:12
4Up, Up, And Away
Bass – Henry FranklinDrums – Chuck CarterPiano – Cecil Barnard*Producer – Stewart LevineSaxophone [Tenor] – Al AbreuTrumpet – Hugh MasekelaWritten-By – Jimmy Webb
5:32
5Bajabula Bonke (The Healing Song)
Bass – Henry FranklinDrums – Chuck CarterPiano – William HendersonProducer – Stewart LevineSaxophone [Soprano] – Al AbreuTrumpet, Vocals – Hugh MasekelaWritten-By – Miriam Makeba
6:29
6Grazing In The Grass
Bass – Henry FranklinDrums – Chuck CarterGuitar – Bruce LanghornePercussion – Unknown ArtistPiano – William HendersonProducer – Stewart LevineSaxophone [Tenor] – Al AbreuTrumpet, Vocals – Hugh MasekelaWritten-By – Harry Elston, Philemon Hou
2:37
7Gold
Bass – Henry FranklinDrums – Chuck CarterGuitar – Arthur AdamsPiano – Bill Henderson*Producer – Stewart LevineTrumpet, Vocals – Hugh MasekelaWritten-By – Hugh Masekela
4:10
8Mace And Grenades
Bass – Henry FranklinDrums – Chuck CarterGuitar – Arthur AdamsPiano – Bill Henderson*Producer – Stewart LevineSaxophone [Soprano, Tenor] – Al AbreuSaxophone [Tenor] – Wilton FelderTrombone – Wayne HendersonTrumpet, Vocals – Hugh MasekelaWritten-By – Hugh Masekela
3:54
9Languta
Congas, Flute, Vocals – Nat "Leepuma" Hammond*Congas, Vocals – James Kwaku MortonDrums – Acheampong WelbeckDrums [Talking], Percussion, Vocals – Isaac Asante*Electric Bass, Vocals – Stanley Kwesi Todd*Guitar – Richard Neesai "Jagger" Botchway*Percussion, Vocals – Samuel Nortey*Producer – Stewart LevineTrumpet, Vocals – Hugh MasekelaWritten-By – Hugh Masekela
4:49
10Been Such A Long Time
Congas – James Kwaku MortonCongas, Vocals – Nat "Leepuma" Hammond*Drums – Stix Hooper*Drums [Talking], Percussion, Vocals – Isaac Asante*Electric Bass, Vocals – Stanley Kwesi Todd*Electric Piano – Joe SampleGuitar – Richard Neesai "Jagger" Botchway*Producer – Stewart LevineRattle [Calabash], Bells, Bass Drum – Acheampong WelbeckShekere, Vocals – Samuel Nortey*Trumpet, Flugelhorn, Vocals – Hugh MasekelaWritten-By – Hugh Masekela
3:59
11Stimela (Coaltrain)
Congas – James Kwaku MortonCongas, Vocals – Nat "Leepuma" Hammond*Drums – Stix Hooper*Drums [Talking], Percussion, Vocals – Isaac Asante*Electric Bass, Vocals – Stanley Kwesi Todd*Guitar – Richard Neesai "Jagger" Botchway*Piano – Joe SampleProducer – Stewart LevineRattle [Calabash], Bells, Bass Drum – Acheampong WelbeckShekere, Vocals – Samuel Nortey*Trumpet, Flugelhorn, Vocals – Hugh MasekelaWritten-By – Hugh Masekela
6:28

Hugh Masekela - Still Grazing
(192 kbps, front cover included)            

Montag, 17. Juli 2017

Ernst Busch - Spanien - Venceremos (Aurora, 1967)


Ernst Busch was called "the singing heart of the labor movement". He was, along with Helene Weigel, one of the best-known singer/actors who popularized Brecht's political plays in the early 30s. His powerful, "metallic" voice was a perfect instrument for outdoor rallies and large performance halls in a time when amplification was generally unavailable. Busch spent the last years of the war in a Nazi prison and, following his release, resumed his singing and acting career in East Germany.

On March 9, 1933, Busch escaped Nazi Germany for the Netherlands, where he worked at Radio Hilversum. His exile took him to Belgium, France and Switzerland; in 1935 he moved on to Moscow, working for the Comintern radio station. From January 1937 to August 1938, he worked as an artist entertaining the International Brigades in Spain and on Radio Madrid. In 1938 he took part in concerts held in Belgium to support volunteers in the Spanish civil war and Jewish refugees from Germany. Busch was arrested in Antwerp on May 10, 1938 and deported to France, where he was interned in the St. Cyprien and Gurs camps.

This EP is a part of Ernst Busch´s recordings on the "Aurora" label between 1964 and 1974 for his wonderful "Chronicle of the first half of the 20st century in songs and ballads".  It features songs rememebering the fight of the International Brigades in the Spanish Civil war. The songs were recorded between June, 1966 and January, 1967, with the conductor Adolf Fritz Guhl.

Tracks:
A1 Riego-Hymne
A2 Söhne des Volkes
A3 Las Companias de Acero
A4 Halt´ stand, rotes Madrid

B1 Wenn das Eisen mich mäht
B2 Hans Beimler, Kamerad
B3 Abschied von der Front
B4 Es wird die neue Welt geboren

Ernst Busch - Spanien - Venceremos (Aurora, 1967)
(320 kbps, cover art included, vinyl rip)




Ernst Busch - Lieder aus dem spanischen Bürgerkrieg - Lieder der Arbeiterklasse

Ernst Busch was called "the singing heart of the labor movement".
He was, along with Helene Weigel, one of the best-known singer/actors who popularized Brecht's political plays in the early 30s. His powerful, "metallic" voice was a perfect instrument for outdoor rallies and large performance halls in a time when amplification was generally unavailable. Busch spent the last years of the war in a Nazi prison and, following his release, resumed his singing and acting career in East Germany.

The songs on this CD are a fair representation of his repertory: Original recordings (all lyrics in German) from the early German labor movement, the failed revolution in 1919, and the Spanish Civil War. Included are two of Eisler's most striking "Kampflieder" from the final crisis years of the Weimar Republic: "Der heimliche Aufmarsch" and "Der rote Wedding" - both are agitprop choruses written to emphasized texts by the communist poet Erich Weinert.

Ernst Busch - Lieder aus dem spanischen Bürgerkrieg - Lieder der Arbeiterklasse
(256 kbps, cover art included, ca. 91 MB)

Canciones De Las Brigadas Internacionales - Songs Of The International Brigade

The Spanish Civil War has been referred to as the last noble cause, or the last heroic war. It's also been said that if the British and the Americans had bothered with Spain, they could have prevented World War Two. The war lasted from 1936 through 1939 and by the end Fransico Franco had overthrown the democratically elected government.

The election prior to the outbreak of the war had seen a coalition government formed among moderate and socialist parties. The Republican government's goals were to reduce the power of the aristocracy and the Catholic Church and try to redress the economic disparity in the country.

Needless to say that went over like the proverbial ton of bricks with those who were going to have to surrender their power. Calling themselves The Nationalists, they formed an army under the leadership of Francisco Franco to overthrow the Republican government. They were supplied with weapons, air support, tanks, and troops by the governments of Italy and Germany almost immediately.
The Republicans received little or no official help from any government, save some assistance from the Soviet Union that was too little and too late. In some ways the Republican side was a typical venture of the left and centre in those, and even these days, where internal fights over power, took precedence over an enemy out to destroy you all. Soviet aid only became available after a faction acceptable to Moscow controlled a goodly portion of the doomed government.
The Spanish Civil War was also notable for two other reasons. It was where the Nazis first put into effect their practice of targeting strictly civilian targets for the sake of the effect on morale. First Guernica, rendered forever immortal by Picasso, then Madrid suffered through bombings.
The other was the fact that in spite of their own government's refusal to oppose Hitler, Mussolini, and Franco (until Hitler signed his infamous non-aggression pact with Stalin, he was actually seen as a bulwark against the Red hoards by far too many Western pundits) young men and women from around the world came to Spain on their own to fight for the Republican cause.
The International Brigade was composed of German, American, Canadian, and others from across Europe who came to fight the fascists. The American soldiers served in what became known as the Lincoln Brigade and became part of the 15th International Brigade. Since their own governments had refused to aid the Republicans, and in some instances had tried their best to prevent people from doing so, it wasn't very surprising that the returning soldiers at the end of the war were ignored in their own countries.

Some, like the Germans and the Italian, had to become refugees because they couldn't go home. When it became obvious that nothing was going to be done to honour their efforts, and in fact official policy has been to ignore the veterans of Spain almost entirely, Pete Seeger and the Almanac singers recorded seven songs that had been sung by the Lincoln Brigade while marching. In 1943 they were released as part of an album called "Songs Of The Lincoln Brigade".
It has been next to impossible to find this and other music of the Spanish Civil War. But now thanks to a Spanish label, Discmedi, the songs and other music of the war have been released on a great CD called "Canciones De Las Brigadas Internacionales (Songs Of The International Brigade)".
The first seven songs are the aforementioned tracks from "Songs Of The Lincoln Brigade", which have been beautifully digitally remastered so they sound great. The six songs following that were originally released in 1940, but had been recorded during the war. The German actor Ernst Busch, who was already living in exile from Hitler due to his politics, recorded six songs with a chorus of soldiers called "Six Songs For Democracy".
They were recorded in the men's barracks so if you listen closely you can hear background noises of wartime activity. Again the sound is great, and it's really nice not to hear these songs like they're being sung to you via a sewer pipe. The only previous recording I had heard of them was so full of echoes it was almost impossible to hear what was being sung.

Following these 13 tracks, the producers of the disc have gathered together some performances of these and other songs of the period by different performers as bonus tracks. Six of them are by Ernst Busch again and are Spanish versions of some of the songs that had been performed by Pete Seeger and The Almanac Singers on the "Songs Of The Lincoln Brigade" album. Again he has recorded them with soldiers serving during the war, and in fact this recording was interrupted by Franco's bombing of Barcelona. On occasion you can hear where a brown-out is occurring as the sound starts to fade away: life during wartime indeed.
Ernst's voice may not be what a North American audience would expect from a musical theatre actor, but he had been working with Bertolt Brecht in Germany, and they had a different attitude towards what sound they wanted on stage. Brecht wasn't interested in pretty, or in polish; he wanted the audience to listen to the words being sung to them, not to just sit back and enjoy the music.
After Busch, we have a brief visit from Woody Guthrie as he sings his version of "Jarama Valley". What's great about this song, as you will have noticed in The Almanac Singers' version earlier on the disc, is that the tune is "Red Rive Valley". The soldiers who wrote these songs had done what was fairly typical for the day, and just changed the lyrics of songs they were already familiar with to make them suit their needs.
The last four songs on the disc are from what I consider two of the United States' finest treasures; The Weavers and Paul Robeson. Paul Robeson was a star football player, Broadway and Hollywood actor, and amazing singer. He was also Black and left wing, which in the 1940s and 50s meant he was considered a threat to society.
He had his passport revoked by the American government so he could no longer do concert tours in Europe. This pretty much guaranteed the end of his singing career, as very few venues in the States would book anyone who was blacklisted by Joe McCarthy. But here we find him in full beautiful voice singing two of the songs he learned from the soldiers when he went to Spain during the War to lend his support to the cause. His version of "The Peat-Bog Soldiers" has to be one of the best I've ever heard.

The last two songs included are by the Weavers. Somehow or other the Weavers were able to play the music of the Spanish Civil War during the 1950's in places like Carnegie Hall without people really twigging to what was going on. Included here are two of those songs; both were recorded in Carnegie Hall but one in the fifties and one in their reunion concert in the eighties.

In Spain today the soldiers who fought in the International Brigade are still considered heroes of the country, in North America, where they came from, they've either been almost completely forgotten, and even worse some were treated like criminals by their own governments. Canciones De Las Brigades Internacionales is wonderful tribute to men who have been ignored for too long.
.
(192 kbps)

Ernst Busch - Canciones de las Brigadas Internacionales (Aurora)



71 years ago, on July 18, 1936, the Spanish Civil War began as a revolt by right-wing Spanish military officers in Spanish Morocco and spreads to mainland Spain. From the Canary Islands, General Francisco Franco broadcasts a message calling for all army officers to join the uprising and overthrow Spain’s leftist Republican government. Within three days, the rebels captured Morocco, much of northern Spain, and several key cities in the south. The Republicans succeeded in putting down the uprising in other areas, including Madrid, Spain’s capital. 

In spite of their own government's refusal to oppose Hitler, Mussolini, and Franco (until Hitler signed his infamous non-aggression pact with Stalin, he was actually seen as a bulwark against the Red hoards by far too many Western pundits) young men and women from around the world came to Spain on their own to fight for the Republican cause.

The International Brigade was composed of German, American, Canadian, and others from across Europe who came to fight the fascists. Since their own governments had refused to aid the Republicans, and in some instances had tried their best to prevent people from doing so, it wasn't very surprising that the returning soldiers at the end of the war were ignored in their own countries.
Some, like the Germans and the Italian, had to become refugees because they couldn't go home.
"Canciones de las Brigadas Internacionales" is another part of Ernst Busch´s recordings on the "Aurora" label between 1964 and 1974 for his wonderful "Chronicle of the first half of the 20st century in songs and ballads". It is the second collection in this series with ballads and hymns related to the fight of the International Brigade in the Spanish Civil War.
Tracklist:
A1 Mamita Mia
A2 Himno De Riego / Himno Republicana
A3 Los Campesinos
A4 Suite
A5 Vorwärts, Internationale Brigade
B1 Nuestra Bandera
B2 In dem spanischen Land
B3 Ballade der XI. Brigade
C1 Canto Nocturno En Las Trincheras
C2 An der Sierra-Front
C3 Die Thälmann-Kolonne
D1 Wie könnten wir je vergessen das Land
D2 Lincoln-Bataillon
D3 Am Rio Jarama, Februar 1937
The tracks of side A are recorded in a continous flow, so they are merged in one track.
(320 kbps, cover art included, vinyl rip)

Sonntag, 16. Juli 2017

Mercedes Sosa Y Gloria Martin‎– Si Se Calla El Cantor (1977)

Mercedes Sosa, the celebrated Argentinian folk singer and political activist, possessed a deep, alto voice and a strong sense of conviction, and had a warm, engaging personality. These qualities helped to make her one of the few Latin American musicians who could, over five decades, command a wide international audience. Described as "the voice of Latin America", she was revered as a commentator on the political and social turmoil that afflicted the region.

Born in San Miguel de Tucumán, the capital of one of Argentina's smallest provinces, to a working-class family of mixed French and Amerindian (Quechuan) ancestry, she began singing and folk dancing as a child. Aged 15, Sosa won a singing concert sponsored by a local radio station. The prize was a two-month contract to perform for the station, and this allowed her to turn professional.
Initially singing a wide variety of popular songs, Sosa gained a local reputation as a rising talent.

After she married the musician Manuel Oscar Matus, the couple began looking to new developments in Latin American music. In the early 1960s, this led them to embrace the nueva canción (new song) movement, which unconsciously mirrored the US folk movement as Chile's Victor Jara and Cuba's Silvio Rodríguez reshaped Latin America's troubadour tradition to reflect the struggles under way across the South American continent.

Sosa and Matus chose nueva canción songs that suited her voice, such as Violeta Parra's Gracias a la Vida (Thanks to Life) and Horacio Guarany's Si Se Calla el Cantor (If the Singer Is Silenced), and her success helped to popularise the movement. Sosa's ability to convey a wide emotional range meant that listeners connected strongly with both songs and singer, and by the mid-1960s she was very popular in Argentina. Nicknamed "La Negra" because of her long, jet-black hair and Amerindian heritage, Sosa issued a series of albums, including Romance de la Muerte de Juan Lavalle (Ballad of the Death of Juan Lavalle) and Mujeres Argentinas (Argentinian Women), that established her as a distinctive artist. By the late 60s, she was drawing material from across the region (including Amerindian communities) and this made her a pan-Latin American star. When Sosa and Matus's marriage ended, Matus forged a respected solo career in Argentina.

In the early 70s Sosa acted in the film El Santo de la Espada (The Saint of the Sword), a biopic of the Argentinian independence hero José de San Martín. Sosa's popularity found her touring internationally, her leftist political sympathies – a 1972 album Hasta la Victoria (Until Victory) celebrated workers' struggles – making her especially welcome in the Soviet bloc. As a champion of the rights of the poor, Sosa became known as "the voice of the voiceless ones". These political leanings caused Sosa trouble when the Argentinian military, under Jorge Videla, staged a coup in March 1976. Initially, only some of Sosa's songs were censored, but as she became seen internationally as a voice of freedom, the harassment increased.

In early 1979, Sosa was performing in the Argentinian university city of La Plata when the military stopped the concert. Humiliating Sosa by searching her on stage, they then arrested her and 350 members of the audience. Sosa was detained for 18 hours until international pressure forced her release (she had to pay a large fine) but this event – alongside increasing numbers of death threats – forced her to flee to Europe, where she lived in Madrid and Paris.

Sosa found exile difficult and returned to Argentina in early 1982. The military junta remained in power, but Sosa's fame excluded her from punishment, and a series of concerts she gave at the Teatro Colón in Buenos Aires, with guest appearances from celebrated Argentinian singers, found her truly welcomed home. A live recording of these concerts was issued after the junta fell. Sosa continued to tour (performing in the UK several times) and to record, her fame growing on an international scale – she shared stages or studios with artists including Luciano Pavarotti, Sting and Shakira. In a career spanning almost six decades, she released 70 albums. She won three Latin Grammy awards and received a huge number of honorary titles including the UN Voluntary Fund for Women (Unifem) prize from the United Nations, in recognition of her defence of women's rights. She remained politically active and vocally opposed Carlos Menem when he was Argentinian president.
"I didn't choose to sing for people," Sosa said in an interview on Argentinian television. "Life chose me to sing." She died in October, 2009.

Gloria Martin was born 1952 in Madrid, Spain.

Tracklist:

01. Si se calla el cantor
02. Cuando tenga la tierra
03. Hasta la victoria
04. El cóndor vuelve
05. Triunfo agrario
06. Canción por el fusil y la flor
07. Mujer
08. Mundo pequeño
09. La canción de alguien que no quería marcharse
10. Eso es así
11. País cultural (G.Martin)
12. El candidato

Mercedes Sosa Y Gloria Martin‎– Si Se Calla El Cantor (1977)
(224 kbps, cover art included)

Samstag, 15. Juli 2017

Violeta Parra - Canciones (Casa de las Américas, Cuba, 1971)

The roots of nueva canción trace to the late 1950s and early ’60s, a notably restive era in Latin American history. Many countries were saddled with ineffective or authoritarian governments, and the gap between the wealthy and the impoverished was widening. Moreover, European and North American cultural influence was becoming increasingly palpable, with musical tastes in particular molded to a significant degree by the commercial-music industry of North America. In that milieu two notable singer-songwriters in neighbouring countries embarked on crusades to reclaim what they perceived as the crumbling social and cultural integrity of their homelands: Violeta Parra in Chile and Atahualpa Yupanqui in Argentina.

Much of the work of Parra and Yupanqui involved collecting old songs from the countryside and reworking - or rejuvenating - them to become “new songs” in a more contemporary, broadly accessible format. Parra commonly cast her song in well-established local poetic forms, and, perhaps most significant, she introduced Andean instruments into the accompanying ensemble. Meanwhile, Yupanqui’s semisung lyrics, intoned atop expressive guitar playing, vividly evoked the hardships of life in the Andes. By developing and promoting a body of popular songs that were grounded in local traditions and that addressed the experiences and concerns of ordinary people, both Parra and Yupanqui helped democratize music in their countries; their songs spoke both to and for the populace.

Tracklist:
01. - Gracias a la vida - 4:26"
02. - Qué dirá el Santo Padre - 2:47"
03. - Hace falta un guerrillero - 3:34"
04. - Arauco tiene una pena - 2:48"
05. - A la una - 3:15"
06. - La jardinera - 2:53"
07. - Y arriba quemando el Sol - 2:45"
08. - La carta - 2:48"
09. - Paloma ausente - 3:06"
10. - Según el favor del viento - 2:18"
11. - Maldigo del alto cielo - 3:47"

Violeta Parra - Canciones (Case de las Americas, Cuba, 1971)
(256 kbps, cover art included)

VA - Chile Vencera! - An Anthology of Chilean New Song 1962-1973

"...The New Chilean Song Movement (“La Nueva Canción Chilena”) was the embodiment, in sound, of all that Allende hoped for Chile. It’s no wonder that after the coup, one of the first orders of business for Pinochet’s military forces was to destroy Discoteca del Cantar Popular (the radical record company that released many of the new song artists), destroying not only the office and studio, but also the master recordings themselves. Today, the new songs survive from old LPs that made it out of Chile.

Stu Cohen, in cooperation with Rounder Records, released "Chile Vencera! An Anthology of Chilean New Song, 1962 — 1973", and the royalties were donated to the Chile Defense Committee. The album is a compilation of new song artists culled from records that weren’t destroyed by the military junta. All the musicians on the album were directly affected by the junta. Victor Jara, as mentioned at the beginning, was murdered by the military, Angel Parra was sent to prison, Isabel Parra and Patricio Castillo managed to escape Chile and seek exile, Quilapayun and Inti Illimani happened to be on tour in Europe during the coup and remained in exile..."

The quality of the recording on this album varies somewhat from song to song. The songs were reproduced from albums and tapes. The original master recordings no longer exist. They were destroyed during the coup.

This double album was released in 1987 on Rounder Records.

Tracklist:

A-1Violetta ParraGracias A La Vida
A-2Violetta ParraQué Dirá Santo Padre
A-3Tiempo NuevoQuena En Verano
A-4Inti IllimaniRun, Run Se Fie P'al Norte
A-5Isabel Parra & Inti IllimaniAmor
B-1Inti IllimaniInti Illimani
B-2Isabel & Angel ParraLa Pericona
B-3Quilapayun*Vamos Mujer
B-4Victor JaraPreguntas Por Puerto Montt
B-5Victor JaraNi Chicha Ni Limona
B-6Victor JaraLa Casitas Del Barrio Alto
B-7Isabel ParraAl Centro De Injusticia
C-1Angel ParraLa Democracia
C-2Payo GrondonaIl Bosco
C-3Charo CofreTolin, Tolin, Tolin
C-4Martín DomínguezLa Burra De Beltrán
C-5Tito FernandezYo Quiero Verte
C-6Rolando AlarconLas Doradas Colinas De Bihn Xuan
D-1Rolando AlarconHermano Llorarás
D-2Tiempo NuevoNo Nos Moveran
D-3QuilapayunLa Batea
D-4Stu CohenSeptember 11, 1973
D-5QuilapayunEl Pueblo Unido Jamás Será Vencido

VA - Chile Vencera! - An Anthology of Chilean New Song 1962-1973

You´ll find more information about the album and some of the songs via
http://rotatestockforfreshness.com/page/2/

Freitag, 14. Juli 2017

Willem Breuker Kollektief - Live In Berlin

Willem Breuker (4 November 1944, Amsterdam – 23 July 2010 Amsterdam) was a Dutch jazz bandleader, composer, arranger, saxophonist, and (bass) clarinetist. In 1974, he began leading the 10-piece Willem Breuker Kollektief, which performed jazz in a theatrical and often unconventional manner, drawing elements from theater and vaudeville. With the group, he toured Western Europe, Russia, Australia, India, China, Japan, the United States, and Canada.
He was also known as an authority on the music of Kurt Weill. In 1997, he produced, with Carrie de Swaan, a 48-hour, 12-part radio documentary on the life of Weill entitled Componist Kurt Weill.

Recorded about a month after their BASF release "The European Scene", "Live in Berlin" is almost as fine an example of their earliest roots. The basic elements are all here, from the shameless purloining of themes from all conceivable genres (especially those not normally associated with the avant-garde) and their conflation with free jazz soloing to the revitalization of schmaltzy pop standards. There's still a certain roughness to the arrangements and performance, but Breuker's determination to set himself apart from the European free jazz scene as represented by the work of musicians with whom he collaborated early on, like Peter Brötzmann and Evan Parker, is very clear. As they and others moved more and more into abstract and non-idiomatic improvisation, Breuker attempted to balance those ideas with a structure that relied on song forms (especially those of composers like Kurt Weill) and the more classically influenced compositions of musicians like Carla Bley. He also insisted on the injection of large doses of humor, an anathema to most of his contemporaries. The Kollektief's spirited rendition of "Our Day Will Come" shows how successful this approach can be, and the album as a whole makes a good case for Breuker's stance. There is a somewhat muted recording quality here and, of the two earliest examples of this band, one would have to give the nod to the BASF release for musical and audio quality, but both are essential to a full understanding of Breuker's music.    


The album was recorded live during the "Total Music Meeting" at the Quartier Latin, Berlin, November 5th, 1975.      
  
Tracklist:

A1Introduction1:17
A2Oratorium18:18
A3Jan De Wit8:24
B1Jalousie-Song5:56
B2Jail-Music9:57
B3Remeeting7:25
B4Our Day Will Come   5:14

Willem Breuker Kollektief - Live In Berlin    
(320 kbps, cover art included)