Samstag, 21. November 2015

Dakar Sound - Volume 1

This is the first in a series of collections of tracks from the famous "Dakar Sound" series.

It brings you some interesting representatives of Dakar´s new urban music of the 1970s to 90s as well as a mingling of passionate and very enchanting songs of Senegal´s most talented traditional singers.

"Dakar Sound" is pleased to invite you to an evening of finest entertainment with the Horoya Band, Madiop Seck, Sekou Diabate, Etoile 3000, Number One, Baobab and many more.

Dakar Sound - Volume 1
(192 kbps, ca. 100 MB)

Freitag, 20. November 2015

Blaze - 25 Years Later

This essential album is a journey thru the life of Lakim, a black activist in the streets of New York and we follow him thru his days - getting exposed to his emotions in songs from spiritual high on "YOU`RE SO SPECIAL" - maybe the best song to the angry and bitter "YOU`RE GONNA MISS MY LOVE" after his babymama told him to leave - he get`s ripped off by a 13 year old girl he is searching for their grandma and so on - motown didn`t like the concept of putting this spoken words interludes on the album , so it`s on the CD only ..respect to Blaze, this album still stands the test of time .

The New Jersey trio's '90 debut album for Maze. Blaze's roster featured vocalist Chris Herbert, keyboardist Josh Milan, and drummer Kevin Hedge, who came together in the '80s doing a good blend of gospel-tinged soul and East Coast dance. They got some attention from the single "So Special," and also the cuts "Get Up" and "Lover Man." They never really hit it big, but did have potential...

Tracklist:
1Get Up5:04
2So Special5:32
3Miss My Love5:20
4You Don't Really Love Me4:19
5Anything For Your Lovin'5:22
6We All Must Live Together6:43
7I Wonder5:59
8Gonna Make It Work6:45
9All That I Should8:24
10Missing You3:34
11Lover Man3:49
12Love Is Forever4:40
13Broad & Market, NWK2:13
14The Hope Song6:06

Blaze - 25 Years Later
(192 kbps, cover art included)    

           

Sonntag, 8. November 2015

Slapp Happy & Henry Cow - Desperate Straights (1975)

There can't be many instances of an entire band merging with another, but that's what happened back in 1974 when eccentric avant popsters Slapp Happy joined avant prog heroes Henry Cow. And (of course) Henry Cow joined Slapp Happy. A rather gnomic press release from the time suggested that "both groups, though different, were the same'. Mmmm....

Slapp Happy (Peter Blegvad, Anthony Moore, Dagmar Krause) had already recorded one album for Virgin, and their charmingly quirky brand of surrealist pop had Mr Branson and his chums thinking they may have had a commercially viable band on their books. A merger with one of the most musically and politically radical bands of the time (also on Virgin) wasn't likely to enhance their earning potential much, but this was the seventies after all.

"Desperate Straights" was recorded before the merger became 'official'. Though the bulk of the material was composed by Blegvad and Moore, the results do feel like a genuine halfway house between the music of the two groups. Despite their reputation for being a difficult proposition, Henry Cow were keen to experiment with more conventional songs. Similarly Blegvad and Moore's avant-garde tendencies were given more room than they had been on their last Virgin effort.

A surprising team up at the time of its release (1975), "Desperate Straights" is a surprisingly melodic album, light on the art school angst and heavy on the playfulness, which one would hardly expect from such determined socialists as these. But here it is: "Some Questions About Hats" sounds like a Kurt Weill outtake, "A Worm Is at Work" gallops along with a sweet tune. Dagmar Krause remains restrained and not given to flights of horrible fancy. "Strayed" is reminiscient of Kevin Ayers's brand of art rock, and most of the songs clock in under two minutes. But never fear: the album ends on the eight minute "Caucasian Lullaby," a minimal woodwind piece that suddenly bursts into one last jab of Krausian despair.       

(Thanks to allmusic.com and bbc.co.uk!)

Tracklist:                           
Some Questions About Hats1:53
The Owl2:17
A Worm Is At Work1:52
Bad Alchemy3:06
Europa2:48
Desperate Straights4:14
Riding Tigers2:02
Apes In Capes2:16
Strayed1:54
Giants1:57
Excerpt From The Messiah1:49
In The Sickbay2:09
Caucasian Lullaby8:25


Slapp Happy & Henry Cow - Desperate Straights (1975)
(256 kbps, cover art included)

Mittwoch, 4. November 2015

Country Joe & The Fish - Together (1968)

"Together", Country Joe & the Fish's third album, was the group's most consistent, most democratic, and their best-selling record. Unlike their first two albums, which were dominated by Country Joe McDonald's voice and compositions, "Together" featured the rest of the band - guitarists Barry Melton and David Cohen, bassist Bruce Barthol, and drummer Chicken Hirsh - almost as prominently as McDonald.

That's usually a formula for disaster, but in this case it gave the album more variety and depth: McDonald tended to favor droning mantras like the album-closing "An Untitled Protest," which worked better when contrasted with the likes of Melton's catchy anti-New York diatribe, "The Streets of Your Town," and the group-written "Rock and Soul Music."

Songs like the latter cast the group as a soul revue, true, and they couldn't quite pull that off, but "Together" had the charming quality of unpredictability; you never knew what was coming next. Unfortunately, what came next in the band's career was a split. Barthol was out by September 1968, Cohen and Hirsh followed in January 1969. Thereafter, McDonald and Melton fronted various Fish aggregations, but it was never the same, even when this lineup regrouped for "Reunion" in 1977.                

Tracklist:
  1. "Rock and Soul Music" (McDonald, Melton, Cohen, Barthol, Hirsh) – 6:51
  2. "Susan" (Hirsh) - 3:28
  3. "Mojo Navigator" (Denson, Melton, McDonald) - 2:23
  4. "Bright Suburban Mr. & Mrs. Clean Machine" (Hirsh, Melton) - 2:19
  5. "Good Guys/Bad Guys Cheer / The Streets of Your Town" (Melton) - 3:43
  6. "The Fish Moan" - 0:27
  7. "The Harlem Song" (McDonald) - 4:19
  8. "Waltzing in the Moonlight" (Hirsh, Melton) - 2:13
  9. "Away Bounce My Bubbles" (Hirsh) - 2:25
  10. "Cetacean" (Barthol) - 3:38
  11. "An Untitled Protest" (McDonald) - 2:45

Country Joe & The Fish - Together (1968)
(192 kbps, cover art included)